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LIFSTYLE: British Furniture Design by Zoe Grant ofwww.inspiredcelebration.co.uk


Whilst a room can be easily updated with a quick coat of paint or a few new cushions, furniture is the more steadfast in our homes.


The arrival of IKEA in the UK in 1987, has afforded the large majority of people the option to update furniture choices more regularly. Since the latter part of the Noughties many have also become eager to purchase solid furniture that has a story to tell. People are less fearful of raising their paddles at auctions to win coveted classic pieces of furniture such as a Welsh dressers or G plan sideboards.


Unfortunately, with such pieces of pre-loved furniture comes tales of woe, scratches, scrapes, torn and worn upholstery that require some elbow grease from their new owners. Upholstery courses are


46 | ukhandmade | Spring 2011


popping up all over the UK and books about upcycling furniture are readily available on Amazon and in bookshops across the country. However, not everyone is prepared to roll up their sleeves and busy schedules stop many experimenting with reupholstery or stripping and waxing old pine chests. Those people need fear not, there are many fabulous designers willing to do the hard graft for us, turning beaten up, old furniture in to beautiful works of art and furniture that will withstand the tests of time.


Ruby & Bettys Attic lovingly refurbishes dressers, sideboards, tables and much more. The mother and daughter team started their business in 2007 when they found themselves unable to find “French vintage style” furniture for their own


homes. Using the highest quality paint in a variety of colours, they hand paint each piece of pre–loved furniture that they source, then gently distress each piece to give it a vintage feel.


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