This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
the amount of work involved or fear of the unknown.


The handmade movement is still gaining momentum. Retailers are starting to realise that stocking handmade products can set their shop apart from the rest. Retail giants like John Lewis are introducing handmade products from independent designers that fit with their target market.


Makers such as Poppy Treffry and Liberty Moore of Cherish Me show it is possible to have great success. Liberty Moore’s products are now stocked in Liberty of London after their Best of British open call for up and coming designers (See our interview with Liberty Moore on page 6).


Another success story is Jane Lindsey of Snapdragon who, in December 2008, decided to take her craft business to the next level and start selling wholesale to shops and galleries. Since then Snapdragon


has grown from a kitchen table enterprise to a thriving business with its own studio and 4 staff members. Jane regularly attends trade fairs and is stocked all over the country whilst still being able to keep the business handmade and personal.


Here she shares some advice for others wanting to take that next step.


• Before you start: Really think about whether straightforward


wholesaling is right for your product. Shops expect to double any price you charge and then add on VAT (now 20%) - so an item selling in a shop for £10 will only net you £4. If you were theoretically to pay someone else to make it would you be able to cover their wages along with materials, rent, admin time, packaging etc and still make a profit?


• Focus: to sell to trade you need to have a range of products but more importantly they need to hang


Spring 2011 | ukhandmade | 11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95