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SECURITY&HARDWARE


ASSA ABLOY SHOWCASES TRIMEC RANGEAT IFSEC


Trimec electromechanical locking solutions are available for the first time in the UK from ASSA ABLOY and will be showcased at IFSEC.


Visitors to Stand (C50) in Hall 4 will be able to view the comprehensive electromechanical locking range, which includes electric strikes, heavy-duty hook locks, motorized bolts and drop bolts.


The latest addition to the Trimec range - the new ES2100 fully monitored strike - will be on display for the very first time at the show. Specifically designed for use in high traffic applications, the solid stainless steel ES2100 features variable voltage and patented, field selectable fail safe/fail secure mode change, whilst the unique integrated door position switch provides door position monitoring.


“The ASSA ABLOYTrimec range offers some of the best electrical strikes and motorized bolts on the market, and has a reputation for innovation and high quality.Trimec solutions can be used in a range of commercial applications to help maintain the balance between accessibility and security, and we’re anticipating a good reception from IFSEC visitors, particularly to the new ES2100 monitored strike.”


Also on display will be the innovative ES9000 electric strike. One of the most flexible products in the Trimec range, the stainless steel ES9000 is specifically designed for commercial applications where high levels of security and accessibility are required.


Opening under a side load of 25kg, the strike is non-handed and interchangeable between fail safe and fail secure, allowing it to be set to either lock or unlock in the event of a power cut depending on application.


The ES6000 is a heavy-duty hook lock suitable for swinging doors, sliding doors and is easily attached to timber or steel doorframes. Power to open and power to lock versions are available depending upon the application, and its high


46 « Clearview NMS « April 2011 « www.clearview-uk.com


IFSEC visitors will also be able to view the cost efficient ES110 electric strike. Deeper than a normal strike-keeper and designed to work with an extensive range of locks, the ES110 is suitable for use with all access control systems and features a stainless steel strike for added security.


preload capability makes it suitable for use in high air pressure environments.


The ES6000 has recently been used at Old


Trafford football stadium to help sink the LED advertising boards. Representing a fast and effective way of dropping the boards into the ground, the ES6000 locks in the same way that it would on a swinging or sliding door to keep the advertising boards in place, meaning that when the latch bolt is electronically withdrawn or unlocked, they simply drop into specially built trenches.


IFSEC visitors will also be able to view the cost efficient ES110 electric strike. Deeper than a normal strike-keeper and designed to work with an extensive range of locks, the ES110 is suitable for use with all access control systems and features a stainless steel strike for added security.


Also on display at the ASSA ABLOY stand will be the high torque Vlock motorised bolt, which moves from a vertical to a horizontal position when locked, moving into a V-shaped strike plate, which pulls the door aligned with the lock.


Alongside the Vlock will be the TB25 and TB38 drop bolts, which provide high security and bolt position monitoring.


Andy Stolworthy, Product Manager for Trimec, said: “The ASSA ABLOY Trimec range offers some of the best electrical strikes and motorized bolts on the market, and has a reputation for innovation and high quality. Trimec solutions can be used in a range of commercial applications to help maintain the balance between accessibility and security, and we’re anticipating a good reception from IFSEC visitors, particularly to the new ES2100 monitored strike.”


For further information on the Trimec range, visit Stand (C50) in Hall 4 at IFSEC or log onto www.assaabloykalideascope.com.


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