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CONSERVATORIESEXTRA


K2 OPEN DAYS A ‘STORMING SUCCESS’


The series of open days organised by K2 Conservatories to mark the construction of their new showroom and formally launch the new orangery roof systems, were a storming success.


Over two separate days they welcomed nearly 120 customers, who came from all over the UK.


Sharon Owen, K2 Sales Director, told


Clearview:” The feedback has been extremely positive. The new showroom showcases our proven portal capabilities and our top of the range Celsius Elite glass. The event itself also allowed us to formally introduce the full range of orangery roof systems, which was extremely well received”.


Sharon explained that full size samples of all three of the orangery systems were built.


The range consists of:


• The Capella: an orangery starter package consisting of an add-on solution of an aluminium gutter and internal soffit.


• The Integra: to be fitted on a parapet wall, it is available in 2 options, one featuring the full 400mm wide aluminium gutter, and the Integra 210, which uses our existing 210 box gutter and the Capella’s internal soffit.


• The Venetian, a self-supported system complete with 400mm wide aluminium gutter and structural legs, for the top of the range orangery designs.


In addition to the new products much interest


was generated by the Building Regulations’s energy efficiency requirements presentation given by Tim Burton from K2 Architecturals. With all the recent changes to legislation, and because orangeries are becoming more popular, the interest in understanding what it all means has become greater.


Particularly the focus was on clarifying the exemptions. BUILDING REGULATIONS DOC L


OCT 2010 – WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN TO CONSERVATORY AND ORANGERY INSTALLATIONS?


Below is the overview - as explained by Tim


Burton - of the changes. It is based on the approved Document L1B and L2B and a letter dated 28th September 2010, from the Department of Communities and Local Government.


(The information below does not apply to Scotland or Ireland).


DEPT OF COMMUNITIES LETTER Sub Paragraph C24 – Conservatories: “Building


control bodies will wish to note that the exemption from the energy efficiency requirements for conservatories and porches has been clarified.”


This means that a conservatory will be exempt from the energy efficiency requirements only where:


• •


It is at ground level. It does not exceed 30m2 in floor area.


• The walls, windows and doors separating the conservatory or porch from the building to which it is attached have not been removed, or if removed, have been replaced by a wall window or door which meets the current requirements for energy efficiency for walls, windows and doors.


• The fixed heating system of the building to which the conservatory or porch is attached has not been extended into the conservatory or porch.


Sub Paragraph C25 – “Where a conservatory or porch does not meet all of the above conditions it is not exempt and Approved Documents L1B and L2B give guidance on what would be reasonable in meeting the energy efficiency provisions from non-exempt conservatories and porches. Building Control Bodies will want to note that the definition of conservatory in terms of percentage translucent material as set out in previous editions of the Approved Documents no longer applies.”


30 « Clearview NMS « April 2011 « www.clearview-uk.com So if the conservatory/orangery does not meet


the exemptions for size, heating or location level then you will need to meet certain criteria, which are as follows:


Building area Walls Floors


Windows Flat roof


Glazed roof


U values (Wm2k) 0.28 0.22


1.60 (combined) or C Rated 0.18


1.60 (combined)


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