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CoMMents FRoM tHe CHIeF eXeCUtIVe


Alan Hamer, Glamorgan Cricket’s Ceo, looks back on the 2010 season and ahead to the fresh challenges of 2011


The final day of the 2010 LV County Championship season will live for a long time in my memory, especially the dejected looks on the faces of the Glamorgan players as they left the field after the drawn game against Derbyshire at the SWALEC Stadium, knowing that they had narrowly missed out on promotion to Division One.


This was in stark contrast to the smiles on the faces of both players and supporters alike earlier in the season as two players, each Welsh-born and at the opposite end of the age spectrum, created their own pieces of cricket history. At Swansea, 40 year-old Robert Croft achieved the incredible landmark of 1,000 first-class wickets for the Club during the four-day match with Leicestershire, and became the first Glamorgan player to achieve the career double of 10,000 runs and 1,000 wickets.


A couple of days later at the St. Helen’s ground there were plenty of smiles when 20 year-old James Harris was presented by Cricket Director Matthew Maynard with his county cap having become the youngest-ever player in the history of the Club to have taken 100 first-class wickets. Indeed, 2010 was a season to savour for the youngster who enjoyed his most productive summer to date for Glamorgan, ending with over 50 first-class wickets for the first time in his career and fully endorsing out long-held policy of nurturing home-grown talent.


As Peter Hybart, the Director of the Cricket Board of Wales mentions in his report elsewhere in this Yearbook, it is imperative for us to identify the elite talent at an early age and then to carefully foster the player’s development into county cricket. I look forward to sharing more of James’ success in the years to come, as well as the emergence of further homegrown talent. With this in mind, I`m sure that I speak for all Glamorgan supporters in saying how delighted I am that Robert Croft will now be undertaking a player-coach role, helping to mentor and nurture the next generation of Glamorgan players, besides sharing his experience and knowledge accumulated during his distinguished career.


As well as witnessing the success of Robert and James, I was pleased as well to see the outstanding batting form of Mark Cosgrove, especially in one-day cricket where he was the second highest run-scorer in the zonal rounds of the Friends Provident Twenty20 competition, besides playing some brutal innings in the 40 overs competition and the County Championship. His strike rate was the highest of any batsman throughout the country, and he was near the top of the boundary-hitting lists at the end of the season.


It was thrilling as well to see Shaun Tait in action for the Glamorgan Dragons in the Twenty20 competition, and like many of the thousands of people at the SWALEC Stadium, I looked up time and again at the big screen to see if the Australian had bowled a ball at 100 miles an hour! It was great to see so many people at the Stadium for our Twenty20 matches, and I was very pleased to report on our above-average crowds for our home matches in 2010.


I`m delighted as well that once again we will have eight home matches in the Twenty20 competition in 2011. Much has been written and said about the structure of the domestic competitions, but we should not forget that the Twenty20 games represent our biggest source of revenue and together with greater success on the field, we should continue to enjoy decent-sized crowds in the future.


The SWALEC Stadium was also nearly full for the One-Day International between England and Australia as once again Glamorgan Cricket successfully hosted another international match. The crowds were somewhat smaller for the pair of Twenty20 Internationals involving Pakistan, but other events, completely beyond our control, affected us in the lead-up to these contests. A wide range of new issues confronted the Stadium’s staff in preparing for these Twenty20 matches, but like


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