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statistical Highlights of the 2010 season


In first-class cricket l


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Robert Croft’s achievement in taking 1,000 first-class wickets, and reaching several other personal milestones in the match against Leicestershire at Swansea, are covered on pages 18 to 22.


Glamorgan’s match against Gloucestershire at Cheltenham saw Robert Croft the first hat-trick for Glamorgan since 1997. In claiming the last three wickets of Gloucestershire’s second innings, he also became the first Glamorgan bowler to end a match with a hat-trick. The last time a Glamorgan spinner had claimed three wickets in three balls in a Championship match had been in 1964 when the great Don Shepherd claimed the only hat-trick of his magnificent career, against Northampton shire at Swansea.


At 40 years of age, Robert also became the oldest bowler to take a hat-trick for the Welsh county, with the previous oldest being Jack Mercer who achieved the feat when aged 39 against Surrey at The Oval in 1932. For the record, the other instances of a Glamorgan hat-trick in Championship crick et had been:


Trevor Arnott (aged 24) v Somerset (1st inns) at Cardiff Arms Park, 1926 Jack Mercer (aged 39) v Surrey (1st inns) at The Oval, 1932 Emrys Davies (aged 32) v Leicestershire (2nd inns) at Leicester, 1937 Jim McConnon (aged 29) v South Africans (2nd inns) at Swansea, 1951 Jeff Jones (aged 20) v Yorkshire (1st/2nd inns) at Harrogate, 1962 Don Shepherd (aged 36) v Northamptonshire (2nd inns) at Swansea, 1964 Ossie Wheatley (aged 33) v Somerset (1st inns) at Taunton, 1968 Majid Khan (aged 22) v Oxford University (2nd inns) at Oxford, 1969 Waqar Younis (aged 25) v Lancashire (2nd inns) at Liverpool, 1997


Mark Wallace scored an aggregate of 185 runs in the match at Cheltenham – this is the most in a Championship match by a Glamorgan wicket-keeper, surpassing Eifion Jones’ tally of 171 against Sussex at Hove in 1968.


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Glamorgan’s matches against Gloucestershire at the SWALEC Stadium and at Cheltenham saw a number of batsmen depart leg before. In the game at Cardiff eight Gloucestershire were dismissed l.b.w. in the visitor’s first innings – the most in an innings in a Championship game involving Glamor- gan since seven Sussex men were dismissed in this fashion at Swansea in 1954.


Then at Cheltenham, the match saw a total of 18 lbws being given – a Glamorgan record, and also equalling the most in a Championship match with the same number as in the game between Glouc- estershire and Sussex at Bristol and the contest involving Sussex and Middlesex at Hove. The world record in a first-class game is 19 relating to a match in India between Patiala and Delhi in 1953/54.


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James Harris – at the age of 20 years and 70 days – became the youngest Glamorgan player to receive a county cap when a special presentation was made before the start of the Clydesdale Bank40 match against Sussex at Swansea. James received his cap from Director of Cricket Matthew Maynard who back in 1987, when aged 21 years and 103 days had received his own Glamorgan cap during the county’s match against Somerset at Weston-super-Mare.


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Earlier in the summer, James had also became the youngest Glamorgan bowler to reach 100 first- class wickets for the club when he dismissed Phil Jaques on the second day of the match against Worcestershire at New Road. At 19 years and 347 days old , he reached the milestone when he had the Australian caught by Ben Wright, thereby beating the previous Club record held by Robert Croft who reached 100 wickets when 22 years and 32 days old.


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