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at the top of the innings and at Taunton he showed that he could also play the sheet anchor role, batting through the innings, besides being the buccaneer, blasting the ball to all parts as he did on many other occasions. In all competitions, he amassed 2164 runs, and for the first time in his Glamorgan career, the left-hander passed 1000 first-class runs, scoring five centuries including a match-winning hundred at Leicester and an equally bucolic one at Cheltenham which laid the foundations for thrilling victories.


Jim Allenby, who opened in one-day cricket with Cosgrove, also enjoyed a highly fruitful summer, finishing within 67 runs of a thousand first-class runs, and at a most healthy average in the mid-forties, whilst he claimed 41 wick- ets to finish high in the bowling averages. Overall, he was one of the top all-rounders in the country and confirmed that he has been the Club’s finest signings for many years. His runs and nous in the middle order were a major bonus, whilst with the ball, he delivered several important spells, not least at Cheltenham when James Harris was incapacitated, returning career-best figures to thwart Gloucestershire’s progress.


Gareth Rees also amassed over 900 first-class runs and once again formed a vibrant opening partnership with Cosgrove. The left-hander continued to show his liking for the Derbyshire attack, striking home and away hun- dreds against them, but he lost his place in the one-day line-up as the season progressed. Jamie Dalrymple also failed to pass the 1000-run mark and the Glamorgan captain was not in such prolific form with the bat as in 2009. Nevertheless, he played some important innings, not least in posting a fine century against Northants at Cardiff which helped to pave the way for an innings win.


Ben Wright also enjoyed his most productive summer in first-class cricket, amassing 847 runs including an out- standing 172 against Gloucestershire at Cardiff which saw Glamorgan, through Wright’s career-best efforts, ease past Gloucestershire’s seemingly sizeable total to secure a decisive first innings lead. He also played some use- ful innings in the shorter-form of the game, notably at Colwyn Bay where he engineered a recovery against the Lancashire Lightning.


However, the young batsman to make most headway in one-day cricket was Tom Maynard who made 380 runs in the Twenty20 competition, including a Club-best of 20 sixes in the competition, whilst in the 40-overs competition he struck the Club’s only one-day hundred of the season - 103* against the Lancashire Lightning at Old Trafford. He also played match winning innings against the Essex Eagles at Chelmsford and against the Surrey Lions at The Oval, whilst at Colwyn Bay, he came within two runs of scoring a maiden Championship hundred in the match against Worcestershire. After a brief flirtation at number three, he increasingly looked at home in the middle-order in the four-day game.


In contrast, Michael Powell, lost his place in the four-day team during 2010, and despite some half-centuries in 2nd XI cricket, was not seen in 1st team action after the match against the West Indies A in early June. When Jamie Dalrymple fractured his thumb against Middlesex at Cardiff, preference was given to Will Bragg who once again had enjoyed a good 2nd XI campaign and had he not broken a finger, Nick James might also have forced his way into the line-up after a highly successful time for the Seconds with both bat and ball.


Mark Wallace also played some important knocks in the Championship, not least at Cheltenham where his century took the game away from Gloucestershire as Glamorgan secured a decisive victory. When given the opportunity, he also scored some useful runs in the shorter form of the game, and with his keeping maintaining a high standard, it was a good summer for the gloveman who amassed 626 runs in first-class cricket.


As far as the bowling was concerned, James Harris was the spearhead of the attack, taking over 50 wickets for the first time in his fledgling career. The 20 year-old bowled with extra zip in 2010, and with the ability to beat the bat on both the outside and inside, he was one of the most effective English-qualified bowlers in Championship cricket, finishing with 63 wickets and a place near the top of the national averages. He was rested towards the end of the Twenty20 campaign, ahead of the sterner challenges of Championship cricket, and though still handicapped by a few niggles, he delivered an outstanding new ball spell against Surrey at The Oval.


David Harrison also bowled some penetrative new ball spells in Championship games, especially at Worcester and Leicester, although he did not subsequently transfer this success into the shorter form of the game. 2010 saw Huw Waters come of age in four-day cricket, with the young seamer bowling decisive spells at Lord’s, Cheltenham and Hove. Waters was often the unsung hero, with his nagging accuracy creating pressure at the other end where wickets tumbled and he can look back with pride on his achievements in Championship cricket in 2010.


Will Owen also made headway, especially in one-day cricket, where his ability to bowl a heavy ball saw the youngster produce some waspish spells, including the only five-wicket haul in limited-overs games in 2010. Chris Ashling also gave glimpses of his bowling abilities in both forms of the game and he will be an asset in the future.


2010 proved to be a frustrating one for Adam Shantry as a knee injury allowed him just one 1st XI appearance all 66


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