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But not for the first time during a frustrating final month, the bowlers could not polish off the Surrey resistance to engineer a much-needed victory, and Glamorgan returned to Cardiff for the final match of the season against Derbyshire with a nine point cushion over third placed Worcestershire whose visit to London had been more suc- cessful than the Welsh county’s as they dismissed Middlesex for 66 to secure a 111-run win. The first day of the final match with Derbyshire saw Glamorgan’s batsmen struggle and after further interference from the weather , a close watch was kept on the scores from New Road where Worcestershire were playing Sussex. With a run chase set up at Worcester, Glamorgan tried to manufacture a similar situation at Cardiff, but Worcestershire’s batsmen feasted on the Sussex attack whilst Glamorgan, after once again making early inroads into the Derbyshire batting, could not polish off the Peakites. The game at the SWALEC Stadium duly ended in a frustrating draw, whilst at New Road the champagne corks were popping after Worcestershire had raced to a four wicket win to secure promotion.


There was disappointment as well in one-day cricket where Glamorgan’s form was far less impressive with the Welsh county finishing bottom of their group in the Clydesdale Bank40 competition and bottom but one in the Friends Provident Twenty20. In all, the Welsh county only won 8 games out of 28 in the Clydesdale Bank40 and Friends Provident Twenty20 competitions. Perhaps though the most telling statistics were that their batsmen shared just one century partnership in the entire season with Tom Maynard scoring the only one-day hundred of the summer whilst adding 101 with David Brown against the Lancashire Lightning at Old Trafford. In contrast, seven centuries were posted by opposition batsmen who shared nine century stands, with the 40-over game at The Oval seeing the Surrey Lions amass a world record 386/3 before the one-day season ended with another ignominious performance at Taunton as Somerset recorded the heaviest-ever defeat in the short form of the game, thrashing the Dragons by 249 runs.


The Glamorgan Dragons though did play some decent cricket in limited-overs games with some of their defeats in the 40 overs competition coming from a short phase of either poor bowling or batting. The nadir of the summer came at The Oval – in front of the television cameras – when the Surrey Lions rewrote the record books, ironically just a week or so after the Dragons had secured a rousing victory over the Sussex Sharks at Swansea with a fine all-round performance against one of the country’s best one-day outfits.


One-day cricket had been a priority for 2010 with the Club’s marketing strategy focussed on the acquisition of Aus- tralian pace bowler Shaun Tait for the competition which now had an enlarged format with sixteen group games. As results unfolded, the Glamorgan Dragons found themselves in the stronger of the two groups as three of their opponents in the South Group reached Finals Day at The Rose Bowl. Interestingly, the Dragons also recorded victories against two of the semi-finalists – the Essex Eagles and Hampshire Royals – and had winning opportuni- ties in one of their games against eventual runners-up Somerset. The Dragons ended up with six victories – but they also suffered ten defeats and finished bottom but one of the South group.


The Dragons began with three excellent victories, all by batting second with the highlight being a scintillating run-chase at Chelmsford with bravura innings from Cosgrove and Maynard as the Dragons mauled the Essex Eagles. But their impetus was lost as the next three games ended in defeats as the Dragons encountered some fine performances from members of England’s winning side in the ICC Twenty20 World Cup. Firstly, Luke Wright produced an explosive innings at Cardiff just when it looked as if the Sussex Sharks were going to lose, then at Richmond Eoin Morgan played a high-class knock to see the Middlesex Panthers to a massive total on the pocket- sized ground.


The third defeat was probably the most decisive as, in front of a large, home crowd the Dragons were restricted to just 94/9 by the Eagles who completely turned around the form at Chelmsford. This proved to be the turning point in the competition as the Dragons became erratic and inconsistent, losing at Hove after a brilliant century by Matt Prior, before a decent victory at Cardiff against the Middlesex Panthers. This was followed by a series of revers- als, starting at Taunton where the Dragons spurned chances to beat Somerset, followed by defeats in successive nights away to the Hampshire Royals – the eventual competition winners - and the Gloucestershire Gladiators.


The Dragons then bounced back with impressive home and away victories over the Surrey Lions, with another match-winning innings from Maynard setting up the victory at The Oval, whilst Cosgrove’s belligerence saw the Dragons to success at Cardiff, leaving them requiring wins in all of their last three games to qualify for the last eight. But the campaign fizzled out with three defeats, starting at Canterbury where fielding lapses cost the Dragons dear before they were outclassed by Somerset in a rain-affected contest at the SWALEC Stadium. The weather also in- tervened in the final match against the Kent Spitfires with the visitors well ahead of the Duckworth-Lewis par score.


Of the bowlers, only Robert Croft enjoyed a successful campaign in the Twenty20 competition, with the 40 year-old taking 22 wickets and ending as the most economical bowler in the entire country. He also had a knack of taking a wicket in his first over, claiming a victim in his first over on seven occasions, whilst he struck three times with his opening delivery. Shaun Tait delivered some hostile spells, whilst Mark Cosgrove finished as the third highest run- scorer in the competition with an aggregate of 562 runs, with the Australian forming a useful opening partnership with Allenby who also began the competition strongly. Cosgrove remained uber-consistent, acting as the bulwark


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