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OBITUARIES Gwynfor (Gwyn) Craven


Gwyn Craven, the Club’s former Chairman and President of Glamorgan Cricket died in Swansea on March 10th, 2010. Gwyn was a useful club cricketer, playing with distinction for both Swansea and Morriston. He also enjoyed a successful career with Barclays Bank rising to the position of Regional Director. Gwyn joined the Glamorgan committee in the 1970s going on to serve as Club Chairman between 1984 and 1987 and, subsequently, as President in 1998. Glamorgan Cricket celebrated its centenary during Gwyn’s Chairmanship and in July 1987, to his immense pride, he was able to welcome their Royal Highnesses Prince Charles and Princess Diana to the Sophia Gardens ground in Cardiff for a special match between Glamorgan and Gloucestershire which launched the Club’s Centenary Year celebrations.


Paul Russell, the Chairman of Glamorgan Cricket said “Gwyn Craven was a gentleman, a gentle man and the most loyal and committed servant of Glamorgan Cricket. Few, if any, have made a contribution to the Club that equals that of Gwyn Craven. Despite a highly successful business career he was a tireless worker for the Club he loved so dearly. He held the two highest offices at Glamorgan Cricket and continued as a Trustee following his retirement from the committee until 2007 when the Club became a limited company. Those of us who knew Gwyn, enjoyed his company and benefitted from his wisdom


and experience can, indeed, count ourselves fortunate. We are all the poorer for his passing.” Gwyn is survived by his wife Joan and his two sons, Robert and David.


stan York


Stan York was known throughout South East Wales for his contribution to cricket. For 78 years he was active in Monmouth- shire cricket, Wales Minor Counties cricket and from junior player through captaincy, chairmanship and finally President of Usk Cricket Club. He was born in 1917 in Usk, the youngest of nine children. After enrolling at Monmouth School aged 11, it was quickly discovered that he had a natural talent for cricket. Even at the age of 15, he was playing for the school first eleven as opening batsman and wicket keeper. At the same age he joined Usk Cricket Club where his talent was nurtured.


From 1935 onwards he was part of the triumvirate of high-class cricketers produced by the club, all of whom played Glamorgan. Alan Watkins went on to play for England, whilst Phil Clift became a county stalwart, but Stan had to make do with occasional games for Glamorgan’s 2nd XI in 1949 and 1950, and was never able to become a contracted player. Glamorgan’s preference at that time was for Haydn Davies as bats- man/wicket keeper although many of Stan’s contemporaries believed he was both a better batsman and wicket keeper.


As with all sportsmen, his career was interrupted by the Second World War. The Usk Club closed in 1939, but Stan was able to play occasional games for Pontnewynydd Cricket Club whilst on home leave. After the war he concentrated his efforts at Usk, becoming a prodigious run scorer and for the next 20 years was at the heart of Usk’s very strong club side alongside his regular opening partner J.E. (‘Ted’) Kerby, Selwyn Watkins, Gerald Kear, Jim Britten, Toby Charles, George Gibbon and Albert Powell.


He was, during this time, active also in Monmouthshire cricket and was well-known throughout the sporting community. In addition to his cricketing activities he also played on the left wing for Pontypool RFC and for the United Services, but his rugby playing was curtailed again by the war and injury. He switched codes to soccer and played for Abergavenny Thurs- days, Panteg, Newport County and Usk Town, but it is for cricket that he is mainly remembered.


After retiring from playing, Stan became an umpire but this was not exactly to his liking as instead he preferred to watch his beloved club. He acted as fixture secretary for many years before becoming chairman (1982 to 1985) and finally Presi- dent of the club in 1991. His contribution to the development of club cricket in South Wales was immense and he is well respected by all with whom he came into contact both on and off the field. He died on April 16 aged 92 years after a long battle with cancer, still President of Usk Cricket Club, a club he served with great distinction for 78 years.


Mike Kear 189


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