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(FPt20) Middlesex Panthers v Glamorgan Dragons at old Deer Park, Richmond on 15th June 2010 Umpires: R K Illingworth and J W Lloyds


scorers: D K shelley and A K Hignell


As one Glamorgan fan was heard to say after this match at Richmond, it was more of a case of playing at Oh Dear Park as the Dragons subsided to their second successive defeat, and their heaviest in terms of runs for five years as the Panthers leapfrogged the Dragons into second place in the table. The visitors had earlier won the toss, but believing the pitch would be firm and true throughout, they opted to bowl first and chase a target – a formula which had worked very well in the opening three contests. On this particular occasion, the wicket took an increasing amount of spin as the match progressed, whilst the Dragons also encountered Eoin Morgan – appropriately at Old Deer Park - one of the young bucks in England’s World Twenty20 winning team. The Irish-born batsman was in prime form with the bat, striking an imperious 79 from just 34 balls which completely took the game away from the Welsh side and deservedly won him the Man-of-the-Match Award. His inventive and destructive innings occurred after the Dragons had seemingly got on top of the Panthers by removing their dangerous duo of Australians, David Warner and Adam Gilchrist, who added 40 runs in the opening three overs with a flurry of belligerent blows. Their flying start was halted as David Brown removed both Warner and Neil Dexter in the space of three balls, and when Gilchrist – who had played on the ground for Richmond CC as a seventeen year-old - departed to the canny Croft after blasting a half-century from 29 balls, it seemed that the Dragons were in the driving seat. But this was merely the calm before the storm generated by a feisty fourth wicket pairing of Morgan and Owais Shah who in the space of 47 balls added a whirlwind 88 with a range of crisply struck blows to all parts of the pocket-sized ground alongside London Welsh’s rugby pitch. Having started by depositing Jamie Dalrymple for six and four in consecutive balls, Morgan upper-cut Shaun Tait for six over third man, before caning Jim Allenby for successive fours, and with two further fours with clever scoop shots against Brown, Morgan hurried to a 22-ball fifty. Shah also clipped James Harris over square-leg for six, but he perished two balls later trying to repeat the stroke. His departure brought Dawid Malan to the crease and after be- ing dropped in the penultimate over, he made the Dragons pay for their fielding indiscretion by feasting on Tait’s final over, drilling the first ball straight for six, before smearing two further fours against the paceman, followed by another massive six over the clubhouse as his efforts saw the Panthers end on a competition-best 213/4. This left the Dragons needing to make their highest-ever score in Twenty20 cricket in order to win the game, and with hopes of a repeat of their Chelmsford run-chase, much depended on their top order if the Dragons were going to come remotely close. After a few lusty blows by Mark Cosgrove and Allenby, the former was caught at mid-wicket, before Allenby became one of three men to swiftly depart in the space of seven balls as the Dragons innings went into freefall with the home spinners gaining considerable assistance from the surface. Despite some defiant blows from Gareth Rees, the spin partnership of Tom Smith and Shaun Udal steadily worked their way through the rest of the order as a series of visiting batsmen came and went in quick proces- sion to the delight of the home crowd which numbered around 2,500. When Warner took a fine running catch at long-on to dismiss Tait, the Dragons had lost by 84 runs – their largest defeat since losing to the Somerset Sabres at Taunton in 2005 – in their first-ever Twenty20 contest against the Middlesex Panthers and their first-ever match at the Richmond ground in south-west London which geographically lies in Surrey rather than Middlesex! All very confusing on an evening which the Dragons would sooner forget.


Middlesex Panthers innings D A Warner


*+A C Gilchrist N J Dexter O A Shah


FOW:


Extras Total


T J Murtagh P T Collins T M J Smith


E J G Morgan D J Malan G K Berg S D Udal


st Wallace c Brown


b Brown


lbw b Croft b Brown b Harris not out not out


13 51 0


Glamorgan Dragons innings M J Cosgrove c Dexter J Allenby


30 79 27


50, 50, 82, 170.


Bowling Croft Tait


Harris Brown Allenby Cosker


Cosgrove Dalrymple


(4 Wickets, 20 Overs) (3lb, 2w, 8nb) 213 13


+M A Wallace J A R Harris D A Cosker R D B Croft S W Tait


b Berg


*J W M Dalrymple c Shah b Smith T L Maynard G P Rees D O Brown


c Warner 37, 58, 60, 60, 70, 87, 101, 121, 122.


o M R W 2 4 4 3 2 3 1 1


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


52 52 30 20 25 10 13


8


1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0


Toss - Glamorgan Dragons won and elected to field


Bowling Collins


Murtagh Berg


Dexter Smith Udal


(All Out, 17 Overs) 129 (3lb, 2w, 2nb) b Udal b Dexter


st Gilchrist b Dexter b Udal b Smith b Udal


st Gilchrist b Smith c Gilchrist b Smith not out


17 30 9 1


29 2 2


18 6 3 5 7


o M R W 2 2 2 3 4 4


0 0 0 0 0 0


17 20 18 24 23 24


0 0 1 2 4 3


Result - Middlesex Panthers won by 84 runs


146


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