This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
pinewood was charred and burned using a Japanese technique to create an iridescent shimmer that would contrast with the nude-colored plaster of the surrounding walls. The brick featured in the dining room


was clay-fired, followed by a hand-applied lacquer stain and oil finish to create a terracotta-like color and texture that recalls well-worn temple walls. The sushi bar is made from a single


fallen pecan tree trunk, and is fronted by sleek white chairs. And the cage-like light fixtures, similar to the fish-basket-style


54 GS MAGAZINE


ceiling lamps at sister restaurant Uchi, are made from steel wire wrapped with silk ribbon. When it came to the custom-built


tables themselves, Hsu went with a more even-toned walnut wood that would highlight the ceramic plates, contemporary flatware, and of course, the food itself. “We wanted to play a supporting role to the cuisine, which is very much about contrasting textures and flavors,” he notes. “We didn’t want to be the whole show.” •


www.uchikoaustin.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60