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Looney & Associates and to principal designer John Nelson, who calls the project “my favorite” since he joined Looney. Pacific House, the victim of a fire, had to be


redesigned from scratch, says Nelson. “We wanted a departure from the original design, which was too rustic and not quite hip enough. We gave the rooms a new layout, made them more nature-related and created a window wall facing the ocean.” Other features include a bathroom wall that can


be peeled away to expose it to the bedroom; two- person sunken tubs and showers; fireplaces with limestone tile; and desks comprised of a walnut slab mounted on a bronze base. The outdoor hot tub


50 GS MAGAZINE


is surrounded by tile that meets a glass panel that acts as a porch railing. “It allows guests to soak while they’re watching the sunset,” says Nelson. The rest of the inn’s rooms followed the


same pattern: a more tailored contemporary feel prevails—“not too themey,” says Nelson—with natural colors, woods, and a greater connection to nature. “We used the traditional cedar that predominated and used it more as an accent,” he adds. “Instead we used a great deal of ash—a lighter and brighter palette than cedar, and very clean- looking.” The original restaurant—named the Restaurant— was also victim of a fire, this one in 2008, which


forced a complete overhaul. The new version retains much of its predecessor’s easy charm. “We could have done an extreme makeover,” says Nelson, “but we wanted to make the locals feel comfortable. So we dolled up the FF&E, added some impactful local art, redid the fireplace, and added a wine cellar and communal table. But it’s still all about great food and great views.” Both of the most recent owners, he says, have


had the same mission for the inn: “They wanted to embrace the solitude of the setting and overlay it with elegance and sophistication. And we think we succeeded. It’s a magical place.” • www.ventanainn.com


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