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W


ho creates nightclub concepts? Historically there has been a recurring cycle in the development of the late


night entertainment scene. Independent operators, brimming with risky untried ideas and verve set up small bars and clubs. They then run them with passion, energy and drive and some become very successful. The larger corporate operators then


buy out the most successful ones and expand the concept as a roll-out. Other groups, seeing those working models, soon jump on the band wagon and suddenly town centre leisure parks and high streets are brimming with similar styles of nightclub. For a while these are successful, despite how similar they all are. Rents jump up as sites become scarce, the independents are bought or pushed out and


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the market becomes flooded with unimaginative copies of the original. The units then find it difficult to compete with each other and invariably start to close leaving empty properties. Historically the independents have moved back in after time with new concepts and the whole ball starts rolling again. The banking crisis however has rammed


a massive greasy spanner in the works. As the availability of loans on leasehold properties became nonexistent the independent operators found themselves in a bizarre position whereby sites were just about being given away but the banks weren’t interested in any high risk funding. So with no new ideas and no new working models, the larger groups ceased developing new sites and have tended to concentrate on sticking to tried and tested concepts. Bearing this in mind it would be a highly risky strategy for a large corporate to throw the rule book aside and branch out with a cutting edge radical


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