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in1931andpacking themusical punch that comes from 4,151 pipes. That organhas beenmostly restored.The console


is currently on display in the Boardwalk Hall lobby and will soon be moved back to the ballroom balcony, where the ACCHOS is hoping to stage a rededication concert sometime in 2011. But it’s the massive Midmer-Losh organ in the


building’s cavernous East Hall that’s the biggest challenge for the experts hoping to bring the organ back to life. The organ is so large it took three years — 1929


to 1932 — just to install the instrument and its 33,000-plus pipes that range in size from 64 feet high — the size of a six-story building — to just a couple of inches long. Some of the pipes are actually made of wood to better replicate the authentic sound of certain instruments. When it was in full working order, the Midmer-


Losh was once listed by Guinness as the world’s loudest instrument and was considered the world’s largest organ before Guinness dropped that category. The Grand Ophicleide in the organ’s “pedal right” division is considered the world’s loudest organ stop with a trumpet note equal to more than six times the volume of the loudest locomotive whistle. Officially, the organ has 33,112 pipes, based on


a 1999 survey of the instrument while Boardwalk Hall was undergoing a $100 million renovation. The organ was built around the entire hall, and its thousands ofpipes arehousedinrooms andcabinets that extend from the building’s basement to its towering ceiling. TheMidmer-Loshconsole, locatedat stage left on


the hall’s sprawling proscenium, is also the world’s largest organ console with 1,235 stop tabs. It’s the only organ in the world with seven manuals that have a range between five and seven octaves. Both the ballroom and main hall organs produce


the sounds of a staggering number of musical instru - ments, ranging from reeds to brass to percussion. In many respects, the organ was the world’s first music synthesizer long before the concept of synthetic music was even considered. Connecting the pipes to the organ console are


literally miles of wires and control boards. Since the wires weren’t color-coded when the organs were installed 80 years ago, replacing the ancient wiring has been a challenge unto itself. The goal of both organizations is to restore the


organs to working order internally, and externally to their original conditions. The ACCHOS offers tours of both organs —


even the smaller organ is the size of a small home — for a nominal fee. For more information about tour schedules, and to learn more about the organs, or to make a donation go to acchos.org. 


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