This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Historical Milestones and aVision for the Future


history to be released next fall. With the help of Stockton’s graphic arts department,Tompkins andGregghope tocreate auniquevolume thatwill celebrate the school’s 40th anniversary of teaching in an unexpected way. “Oftenwhenthepublic thinksof “history” they thinkofdry accounts of


what happened or anecdotal stories placed within a timeline,” Tompkins said. “We wanted much more than that. We wanted the book to be visually attractive because it has to appeal to many audiences.” The anthology will include over 50 essays, early photos of the college,


artwork and architectural sketches that help to show Stockton as a distinguishable institution in higher education. The project also includes an official website, including rare video and audio clips, along with an unofficial blog following the process of putting together the book. InTompkin’s opinion, thehistory of Stocktonshouldhave beenwritten


25 years ago when the memories of those founding faculty and staff members who have since passed away could have been added to the book. “Our story clearly needs to be told and while the few of us left can


witness to the history we have lived,” Tompkins said. “In this way, the volume will be a tribute to those whose voices are not contained in its pages, as well [as] honoring the voices it does include.” One aspect of the book pays tribute to a topic becoming increasingly


relevant in today’s society. According to Stockton President Herman J. Saatkamp, Jr., it is also one of Stockton’s four key themes: sustainability. Environmental awareness has been an integral part of the college’s


history. In December of 1993, shortly after the college was renamed ‘The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey’, all of the campus’ academic buildings were officially online with the help of a geothermal heating and cooling system. The system generated $300,000 in fuel savings for the college each year. Since then, Stockton has remained on the forefront in environmental efforts.


 In 1997, the college partnered with Rutgers University to create


the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve located on the Mullica River. Stockton has also lived up to it’s title of “New Jersey’s Green College” through the research conducted at facilities like the Nacote Creek Marine Science and Environmental Field Station, its hosting of the Global Interdependence Center Conference this past September, and through the school’s efforts in sustainable building. A prime example of the ‘green development’ movement is the


school’s current 154,000-square-foot Campus Center project, part of Stockton’s largest renovation since the Pomona campus first opened in January 1972. The Campus Center, set to open this spring, is more than just aesthetics. Its design will follow the LEED Gold Standard in sustainable design and incorporate solar roof panels, an environmen- tally friendly heating and cooling system, and a storm water collection


njlifestyleonline.com LIFESTYLE | January 2011 11


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