This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
StocktonCollege I


By TAYLOR ST.JOHN


t was September of 1971, and Atlantic City’s dilapidated Mayflower Hotel had suddenly been reincarnated. The commotion of over a thousand voices bellowed out of the hotel’s guest rooms, ballroom and hallways that had stood empty for so many years. Richard Stockton State College had officially opened its doors—or rather the doors of its temporary


Atlantic City home—to 1,000 students, 97 staff and approximately 60 full-time faculty members. While construction of the school’s designated Pomona campus continued


through that December, students and professors filled every nook of the historic boardwalk resort for the first half of the school year, eager to be a part of the inauguration of South Jersey’s first four-year institution. “The excitement of starting a college there was palpable each day,” Kenneth


Tompkins, Professor Emeritus of Literature, said. Tompkins is one of only eight to ten original faculty members still teaching at Stockton today. “Starting on the boardwalk was noisy, strangely public and surrounded


with odd businesses. The hotel was generally dim, musty, leaky... but we didn’t seem to mind.” Over the years, Stockton has grown from that small overly passionate, but


under-resourced group to a thriving institution with a population of almost 8,000 undergraduate and post-graduate students. Approaching its 40th anniversaryof teaching this coming September, Stockton’shistorical achievements and current endeavors help shed light on a future that’s looking increasingly bright for the school.


 One of Stockton’s currentprojects is todocument thosemilestones inthe form


of essays and artwork. Tompkins and Robert Gregg, Dean of the School of Arts and Humanities, are co-editors of the publication chronicling the college’s


StateSenatorFrank “Hap” Farley addresses an audience during the ground breaking ceremony at Stockton’s Pomona campus on December 9, 1970. Behind the Senator, Board of Trustee members and Stockton’s first president Richard Bjork listen to Farley’s speech.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68