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training


Academy plans route to front of house success


TRAINING and qualifications ‘roadmap’ for front of house staff is to be launched by the sector’s professional body. Citing recent BBC2 programme Michel Roux’s Service for putting the role of front of house staff in the spotlight, the Academy of Food and Wine Service (AFWS) said the roadmap will offer a framework to take trainees from entry level through apprenticeship and advanced apprenticeship to a foundation degree in food and beverage management. The framework will also include opportunities for existing employees to develop supervisory and management skills by attending short work-based seminars, masterclasses and on-line learning programmes. Paul Breach, AFWS deputy chairman and director, said there’s a strong demand for training in the


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academy a fantastic opportunity to raise the profile of front of house further and to demonstrate the broad range of exciting career opportunities available,” he said.


“The ball is now rolling to make front of house an attractive place to work, helped by some of the fantastic role models in the programme, such as academy members Laura Rhys at TerraVina, Peter Avis at Babylon, Ronan Sayburn at Hotel du Vin and, of course, Fred Sirieix [Galvin at Windows], all of whom are at the top of their profession and following interesting, rewarding careers.”


Front of house offers a broad range of exciting career opportunities, according to AFWS.


hospitality industry, with many of the organisation’s members keen to enrol


on courses. “Michel Roux’s Service has given the


AFWS executive director Sophie Roberts-Brown said programmes like Michel Roux’s Service have put service at the top of the agenda. “People are talking about what makes good, and bad, service and where they’ve experienced it,” she said.


24 - SLTN - February 17, 2011


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