This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
T


his month Graham Pavey told us all about Patio and Courtyard Gardens. When you sit


on your patio with a nice glass of something to sip after a hard day at work, you want to be able to enjoy your garden without any obstacles to block your view so you need to dispense with that wall at the edge of your patio, plant up just a few pots with seasonal flowers and group them together near the edges, this opens up your garden and encourages you to take a gentle stroll and relax. The choice of surfaces for patios is extensive


and the pictures we were shown gave us all an idea of the many choices. If you want a bit of privacy then a pergola is really useful and you can use such wonderful plants to cover it, choosing colour, fragrance and even fruit to enhance the area. A water feature can add so much to the area


and here also the choices are too numerous to mention. The plants are all important once the basic structure is laid out. Sage to soften the edges,


iris unguicularis for winter flowering, thyme for fragrance and covering manhole covers, agapanthus for structure. The list is, of course, endless. So get rid of that wall and open up your garden to all the possibilities. Proposed trips to visit gardens this year so far


are: - A long weekend in Barcelona - 6 to 9 May A coach outing to Cottesbrooke Hall Plant


Finders Fair - Saturday 25 June A long weekend in Northumberland – 23 to 26


September. Our next meeting is on Thursday 21 April


when we will be hearing all about London Bridge in Arizona and about the desert, to see the effect that high rainfall due to climate change is having on cacti and other desert plants. We are always looking for new members and


our meetings are held on the third Thursday of the month in the Manor House Sports and Social Centre so you can have a drink before we start at 8pm. Visitors only £1 For more details contact our Secretary, Jane on 01923 447281.


92


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112