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F


or the past couple of weeks, the proposed 20mph zone in Abbots Langley has been the


main item on my e-newsletter. Most weeks, around 1,200 local residents receive a short bulletin of local news and information about the Abbots Langley area straight into their inbox. In an average week I receive around 50 responses to the newsletter. So far, the 20mph zone has attracted over 250 replies. I have received replies mainly from residents,


but also from 10 local shops. Of the residents that responded, over 95% were in favour of lowering the speed limit. Amongst the businesses, the split was 60% in favour, so a smaller majority, but a majority all the same. The question that everyone asks is ‖What traffic calming measures are proposed?‖ followed quickly by ―We‘re not having humps, are we?‖. To which the answer is ‗Not if I have anything to do with it!‖. There are no proposals for the High Street at


the moment. The county council wanted to gauge support before drawing up firm plans to circulate. As well as no humps, bumps, tables or cushions, a majority of respondents would like to see the 20mph zone extend from the entrance to the High Street through the shopping area at least to Kitters Green, if not all the way to the junction of Gallows Hill Lane and Hazelwood Lane. This would cover the shops, library, three churches, Henderson Hall, doctors‘ surgery, park, play area, police station and a lot of children walking to school. Quite a few residents have asked why there


are no crossings provided or proposed near the library, at Vine House and near the entrance to the play area at the Manor House. The answer is that the bends in the road make crossing at any point between Tibbs Hill Road to just before the


junction with Hazelwood Lane unsafe for either a Zebra or Pelican crossing and the road is too narrow for a pedestrian refuge island. But slower traffic will make it easier to cross


the road, which will be safer for all of us, especially schoolchildren and our senior citizens. It will make the village even more of a community and encourage people to use more of the shops and facilities in the centre of the village. And it will add just a few seconds onto a journey. Please let me know if you have any more ideas or opinions, either to my home address of 100 Kindersley Way, Abbots Langley W D 5 0 D Q o r b y e m a i l i n g sara@abbotslangley.com The council is currently consulting with


residents and in particular local children about the refurbishment of play areas at South Way and Langleybury. Including money from planning contributions, council funds and a small grant from Watford Community Housing Trust, there is a total of £140,000 to spend between these two play areas. There will then be a design process, before a final opportunity to view and choose between proposals. The new equipment will be installed in about a year‘s time. This may be the last of my monthly columns. I


say ‗may‘ as I never know what fate and the electorate has in store for me. Next month sees elections for all 15 councillors on Abbots Langley Parish Council and I will be one of a number offering myself for re-election. I do believe that having a vote is really


important and I never forget that there are many places where either the franchise is not universal or where elections are not free or fair. So whatever your views, please try to cast your vote on 5May.


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