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NIGHT MUST FALL


This play produced by the Abbots Langley Players, billed as ‗A Psychological Thriller‘, was on for four nights at Henderson Hall; (it is worth noting that this is a wonderful hall for local drama – shame that ALPC are considering closing it) First impressions were of an atmospheric set


with well chosen period furniture and plenty of attention to detail. This set the scene for the play which was set in the 1930s. The attention to detail was again evident in the costume choices including the servant‘s outfits which had clearly been chosen with great care. The play started off well as we were introduced


to the characters and given brief background details as to how they fitted into the plot. We were shown how owner of the bungalow, the unbearable harridan Mrs. Bramson portrayed wonderfully by Annette Toms, was disliked intensely by all including her niece and employee, the dour and plain Olivia Grayne played very gravely by Valerie Gale. We were


introduced to the mysterious page boy Dan who on first appearance was cheerful and friendly, his laddish humour and attentive manner ingratiating him to Mrs Bramson. His descent into a murderous psychopath was played very well by David Powell, however the hysterics towards the end were rather overacted! The play was slow moving in parts and the plot


was rather clumsy with the outcome not a surprise at all – there did not appear to be a twist in the plot which the audience might have expected from a psychological thriller. However there were some entertaining comedic moments particularly from the cook played by Colette Holmes. However all in all a pleasant evening, well


acted and presented by the local drama group.


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