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The Slaves: Craig Joiner, Merv Goldsworthy and Andy Wells. BAND CELEBRATE 15 YEARS OF ROCKING TO THE MUSIC A


band which has been rocking in Watford since the mid 1990s is celebrating its 15th


birthday this year. The Slaves are popular regulars on the town‘s


live music scene with a dedicated local following. The band is made up of Craig Joiner who plays


the guitar and is the lead singer, Merv Goldsworthy, on bass guitar and drummer Andy Wells. The trio play a wide range of covers from artists spanning the last five decades including


The Beatles, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Killers and U2. Craig, from Chorleywood, explained the secret


of their longevity. He said: ―Someone asked me what‘s been the highlight of our time together and I can honestly say all of it has been great. We‘re all very good mates and there are no big egos in the band. ―All of us are professional musicians which


reduces a lot of the stress bands are under when they are trying to juggle working and playing gigs.‖ The band met on the live music scene in 1996


and since then has played hundreds of gigs as far afield as Cannes and Barcelona. Closer to home The Slaves can often be found playing at The Horns in Watford and The Red Lion in Apsley. The band‘s pedigree is backed up by their


musical CVs and day jobs. Craig has written and performed music for a long list of TV and radio adverts and for hit shows including Friends and Cold Feet. Merv has toured alongside the likes of Tina Turner and Meatloaf while Andy has performed with stellar acts including Whitney Houston and Roxette. Craig added: ―We‘ve got some great fans in and


around the Watford area and it‘s a buzz to see familiar faces at our different gigs. ―I think people like the fact that we play totally


live. By that I mean we don‘t have a mini-disc backing us up. What you hear is what you get and thankfully people seem to like it.‖ To find out more visit www.theslaves.net


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