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Ayo Ogundimu is through to the second round of auditions for the X Factor.


A


X FACTOR HOPEFUL AYO SINGS HIS WAY BACK TO HEALTH father-of-two from Abbots Langley has


overcome a crippling injury to reach the


second round of the X Factor. Ayo Ogundimu, 44, of Kindersley Way, has


breezed through the first round of the talent contest despite being in a wheelchair for many years following a car crash in 2006. Ayo who was selected after sending through an


online video to the competition feels singing has helped his recovery. He said: ―I was driving to work when someone


crashed into the back of my car. All I can remember was a loud noise and passing out. In the years that followed the crash I was in a lot of back pain. ―I spent many years either in a wheelchair or


on crutches. It was a very tough time as I couldn‘t work due to my injuries. ―It was when I was housebound that I started singing. My friend Mike Forrester is a musician


who lives in the village and he encouraged me to sing. Through singing I found a positive focus for my life. I was very low for a while but singing and music brought me back to life.‖ Things took a turn for the better in October


2010 when Ayo had a back operation which helped him regain his mobility. ―The operation worked and relieved me of a lot of pain. ―Added to the singing I felt well enough to


apply to the X Factor through the internet in January. ―When I heard I‘d been accepted I rang Mike


and was screaming with joy. My wife was stunned and my kids were beaming with joy when I told them.‖ Ayo sang a cover of soul classic Stand By Me


which got him through to April‘s audition at the Excel Centre in London. Read next month‘s My Abbots News to discover how Ayo got on at the auditions.


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