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Vacationer Come explore NJ’s Southern Shore.


THE PUBLISHING PARTNERSHIP’S REPRESENTATIVES:


Atlantic County Howard Kyle


1333 Atlantic Avenue,


Atlantic City, NJ 08401 609-343-2223


www.aclink.org


Cape May County Tourism Diane Wieland/Deborah Bass


Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 609-463-6415 or 1-800-227-2297 www.thejerseycape.com


W


Cumberland County Tourism Kim Gauntt, Administrator of Recreaction & Tourism PO Box 472, Bridgeton, NJ 08302


HAT EXIT? That’s the only question you really need to ask when you’re looking for that perfect vacation destination in Southern New Jersey! Along New Jersey’s Southern Shore that question typically means what exit off the


Garden State Parkway, the state’s major thoroughfare and the road to countless vacation memories. So, take a ride with us “down the shore” within the pages of the 2011 Southern New


Jersey Vacationer and discover what each exit has to offer. Beginning at exit 38 on the Garden State Parkway, take a chance at one of the many


world-class casinos in Atlantic City or stop at Exit 25 for the Boardwalk fun and magnifi- cent beaches in Ocean City. Exit 13 heads directly into Avalon or head east from Exit 10 for Stone Harbor. That same exit, with a right hand turn will point you in the general direction of Cumberland County, the Delaware Bay side of Southern New Jersey and plenty of vacation fun including the New Jersey Motorsports Park in Millville. More beaches – free, of course – plus the excitement of the world famous Wildwoods


Boardwalk is waiting at Exit 4. And, at Exit 0 it’s America’s First Seaside Resort, Victorian Cape May, filled with five star restaurants that have earned this town the reputation as New Jersey’s culinary capital. Check out “Cheap Thrills” for great ideas to add loads of fun without breaking the


family budget with free or low-cost events and attractions to stretch vacation dollars. Are you a foodie? The Vacationer addresses this passion as well with fabulous Italian


restaurants, Irish pubs, Asian, Thai, Indian and other ethnic favorites in Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland counties. There’s also good, old fashioned Boardwalk favorites – pizza, hot dogs, soft pretzels, Curley’s Fries and ice cream – and of course, seafood from local waters paired with Jersey Fresh produce. Finally, the 2011 Vacationer will help fill every moment with something fun, incredibly


exciting or simply relaxing. Bask in the sun on our sugary-white sandy beaches, stroll the streets lined with colorful Victorian homes in Cape May or Bridgeton, or take on a new adventure fishing, boating or biking. There’s no doubt that a visit to NJ’s Southern Shore offers a world of fun at every exit! Thanks to our contributors who produce this guide, especially our photographer


Craig Terry who works all year to capture the spirit of NJ’s Southern Shore. Thanks also to our partners Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland counties who work with the Southern Shore Regional Destination Marketing Organization to produce this guide. We appreciate their shared vision. ■


Ocean View Welcome Center The Official Welcome Center at NJ’s


Southern Shore. Need more information?


Pick up a guide book, a map, or simply ask a question... the friendly staff at the Ocean


View Welcome Center are ready to assist you. Located at Mile Marker 18.3 N/S on the Garden State Parkway. 609-624-0918.


4 S O U T H E R N N E W J E R S E Y V A C A T I O N E R


856-453-2184 or 1-866-866-MORE www.moretooffer.com


Southern Shore Regional


Destination Marketing Organization A regional tourism council serving


Cape May & Cumberland Counties. www.njsouthernshore.com


Sassafras Design Michael L.B. Lacy


16 East Meyran Ave, Somers Point, NJ 08244 • 609-926-3076 Over 25 years of award-winning


publishing & tourism related experience. mlblacy@mac.com


Write Impressions


Barbara St. Clair, Laura St. Clair Tracy Neri/Sales


151 W. Morning Glory Rd. Wildwood Crest, NJ 08260


writeimpressions3@comcast.net


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