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Technical focus


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Over the last two years we have been coping with the effects of the economic downturn. Before that happened there was some very serious activity going on to reduce carbon emissions. Driven by the UK Government’s target of an 80 per cent drop in emissions by 2050, this was a significant challenge to the carbon generators and energy users. During that time we have seen a quiet revolution in lighting technology, and as we emerge from the recession lighting is ready to meet the challenge of reducing carbon, saving money and maintaining lit performance. The LED is still the new kid on the block but is offering serious challenges to traditional light sources. You have to be careful, however, when presented with headline numbers. As a light source it can now generate 160 lm/w, which is higher than everything other than the SOX lamp. However, in a practical luminaire you can reduce that by 50 per cent due to thermal and other losses. This still leaves you with a luminaire efficiency that is challenging the fluorescent lamp. (Take a 100 lm/w lamp and put it into a luminaire that is 80 per cent efficient). So we should see developers beginning to embrace the LED as buildings once again begin to rise out of the ground. Indeed the problem is that a luminaire that is specified at the start of


18


rise Mike Simpson, technical manager at Philips Lighting, discusses the rise of the LED.


construction will already be out of date by the time it comes to install it. So we have to think about a new way of procurement that allows the very latest products to be used.


In the retail sector the ever-popular MR16


reflector lamp is already on its way out as new LED luminaires and retrofit LED lamps offer the same light output for a fraction of the energy. A 50W lamp can now be replaced by a 10W retrofit, and we can now see a whole portfolio of replacement lamps for every application. The added bonus is the reduced heat loading within the store, making it more comfortable for customers with the added bonus of a reduced cooling load. In the home, as we are just adjusting to using compact fluorescent lamps, so the LED retrofit will also make its mark. It is estimated that by the time we reach 2050 all our domestic lighting will be LED, reducing the country’s domestic lighting load by 90 per cent compared to 2009 levels – well ahead of Government targets. In addition to the energy reduction we also have the benefit of extended life, with LED products lasting anything from 20,000h to 60,000h. With such energy and life properties comes the possibility of exaggerated performance claims. To help regulate this fast moving technology the


Contact Philips Lighting www.lighting.philips.com


UK’s leading professional and trade organisations have jointly published ‘A guide to the specification of LED products’ which should be used to ensure you get what it says on the tin.


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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