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Main image: A private residence lit with LEDs by The Light Corporation. Above (from top): GE Lighting’s GU10 and Infusion; LEDs in the kitchen and gym of the private residence lit by The Light Corporation.


specification. Always use the best possible quality.’


Andy Davies, PM LED Solutions, GE Lighting, says LED lighting can now be up to 10 times more energy efficient than incandescent lights with the same light output, and this number continues to increase.


He says making an informed decision about an LED system is unlike any other lighting purchase. ‘Comparing fluorescent, incandescent or HID products to each other is easier because there are long established industry standards you can rely on. In contrast, LED standards are


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relatively new and are not yet universally applied. Making decisions even more difficult is the large number of new companies entering into the lighting market, as well as established companies using LED technology for the first time. It is, regrettably, a fact that some are making questionable performance claims. Lighting designers should apply caution as when companies claim their system lasts 10 or more years, they often fail to mention that the light output may drop by 50 per cent or more during that time. It’s hard for customers to know whom or what to believe.’


Fortunately, GE Lighting has championed the need to define a universal set of performance measures to put comparison claims on equal footing. GE Lighting has been actively working with NEMA, DOE/Energy Star, ANSI, Intertek and IESNA to develop measurement, efficiency and performance guidelines to add clarity, not confusion to the selection process. ‘While this process is underway, it's crucial that customers apply caution when selecting LEDs and have full confidence in the products they specify,’ continues Davies. Harvard Engineering’s dimmable LED


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