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LEDs


Let’s talk LEDs The impact of LEDs on the industry – the good, the bad, and the ugly.


Whether you like it or not, LEDs are now a major part of the lighting scene. Great progress is being made to match LEDs to more conventional types of lighting such as halogen, and progress is good. Many projects are now proving that LED technology is a serious contender, although poor colour rendering can raise its ugly head in some cases. ‘LED technology has been rapidly advancing for the last five years, and has been a source of increased product development for lighting manufacturers in every application in almost every type of project,’ believes Craig Churcher,


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marketing co-ordinator at The Light Corporation. He feels that LED technology is now much more capable of producing results comparable to more conventional light sources, which has created more and more demand from customers to use it in their projects.


The Light Corporation recently completed a residential project in central London that was lit purely with LED fittings from its range including LED downlights, wall lights and strip lighting. This confidence in LED technology re-iterates that the market is changing to incorporate more energy efficient products in many


areas of interior and exterior lighting. Douglas James, director of Mindseye, can see both sides of the LED spectrum. In terms of the good, he says: ‘LEDs can be energy efficient. They are long life – you should expect 40-50,000 hours of useful life from good quality LEDs, if properly thermally managed.’ In terms of the bad, he says: ‘In most cases at the moment LED is not a realistic substitute for something as efficient, straight forward, and effective as fluorescent for example.’ And the ugly: ‘Most LED systems have poor colour rendering so spaces can look weird if you are not careful with


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