This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BAKKEN BREAKOUT • Winter 2010-11


Page 25


“A pipeline is a relatively simple system,” Kringstad said. “Essentially it is a pump and pipe below ground. Pipelines are a safe, environmentally friendly, economical and reliable way to transport energy commodities. Pipelines are less likely to be impacted by bad weather; therefore, pipelines can operate all day every day.”At the well site, water, crude oil and natural gas separate, the water is reinjected back


North Dakota has both crude oil and natural gas pipelines moving product out of the western portion of the state since oil and gas must be transported through separate pipeline systems. Major projects are currently underway for crude oil pipelines that carry a price tag of approximately $1 billion. Projects are also in the works for natural gas pipelines that have a projected cost of more than $2 billion. Building a new


THE U.S. HAS THE LARGEST


NETWORK OF PIPELINES OF ANY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.


into the earth, the crude oil is shipped out, and the natural gas is either moved via pipeline to a processing plant or flared at the site. Most pipelines range from two to 16 inches in diameter, although some pipelines can be as large as 48 inches.The product is propelled through the pipelines by pump stations located at various intervals.The average speed that crude oil travels through a pipeline is comparable to a fast-paced walk.


pipeline is not a simple process. Steps include determining the route, easement acquisition, engineering and survey work, construction planning, contracting and logistics, local permit acquisition and stakeholder relations.


All Aboard! The first railroad reached the Dakota territorial line in 1871. Railroads were vital to North Dakota as they lured settlers into the state and carried farm


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48