This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BAKKEN BREAKOUT • Spring 2011


Williston to Bismarck: Every Monday — Departs Williston 5 p.m. Arrives Bismarck 6 p.m. Every Friday — Departs Williston 2:30 p.m. Arrives Bismarck 3:30 p.m.


Additional information may be accessed at www.bakkenair.com or by calling Executive Air Taxi at 701-258-5024.


Oil pipeline delayed for more environmental review OMAHA, Neb. (AP)— A proposed pipeline designed to carry Canadian tar sands oil to refineries along the Gulf Coast will be delayed further while the U.S. government conducts an additional environmental review. The U.S. State Department announced that it planned to conduct the additional review environmental groups had demanded. A presidential permit from the State Department is required because the pipeline would cross the U.S.-Canadian border.


Calgary-based TransCanada first submitted its Keystone XL project for State Department review in late 2008. The project is designed to carry crude oil from tar sands near Hardisty, Alberta, to the Gulf Coast via Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. TransCanada has also proposed connecting the pipeline to the Bakken oil field in Montana and North Dakota.


TransCanada officials had previously predicted that a decision on the project would come by the end of 2010. The State Department's decision to issue a supplemental environmental report triggers a longer review process, so the Keystone XL project will be delayed further.


ND pumps record 113 million barrels of oil in 2010 Associated Press — North Dakota pumped a record 113 million barrels of oil in 2010, smashing the previous high set a year earlier by 33 million barrels, state Industrial Commission records show.


The state set production records almost monthly in 2010, jumping from an average of 236,200 barrels daily in January to nearly 343,900 in December. A record 356,505 barrels a day was pumped in November, with nearly 10.7 million barrels produced for the month, state documents show.


December production figures were the latest available, because oil production numbers typically lag at least two months. One year ago, the state had an average daily drill rig count of 94.


Lynn Helms, director of the state Department of Mineral Resources, said in a statement that a harsh winter has hampered oil production, with 677 wells idled this month due to severe weather conditions. He said more than 1 million barrels of oil have been stranded at well sites, unable to make it to market.


The state produced a record 113 billion cubic feet of natural gas in 2010, up from 92.4 billion cubic feet the year before.


Helms’ statement said natural gas production also has been hurt by weather conditions. The amount burned as a byproduct of oil production “remains well above normal,” he said.


Industrial Commission records show that about 30 percent of natural gas produced last year was not sold; it’s unclear how much of that gas was flared.


Less than 1 percent of natural gas is flared from oil fields nationwide, and less than 3 percent worldwide, says the Energy Information Administration in Washington, D.C.


North Dakota Average Rig Count


20.0 35.5 51.0 66.5 82.0 97.5 113.0 128.5 144.0 159.5 175.0


2007 2008


2009 2010


Page 27


Jan


Feb


Ma Apr r


Ma Jun y


Jul Aug Source: Industrial Commission of North Dakota, Oil & Gas Division North Dakota Monthly Oil Production


10 12 14 16


6 8


4


0 2


2007 2008


2009 2010 2011


Sept


Oct


Nov


Dec


Jan


Feb


Ma Apr r


Ma Jun y


Jul Aug Source: Industrial Commission of North Dakota, Oil & Gas Division


Sept


Oct


Nov


Dec


Oil Production in millions of Barrels


Average Rig Count


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48