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/// THE CHEAP ISSUE


LEMONJELLO’S


Music Venues


Cheap Shows I


Comedy T


he West Michigan music scene is starting to resemble lyrics to the Pavement song “Cut My Hair.” “[It’s] crazy; bands start up each and every day.” However, just because it is crazy


does not mean it has to be expensive. There are plenty of venues all over the area that feature shows several nights of the week, with covers ranging from free to less than $5. Mulligan’s Pub (1518 Wealthy St., Grand Rapids) in Eastown


is a major league local favorite. While its regulars know it as the bar that does not change, it has recently made one major addition. Within the last two years, Mulligan’s opened a venue with a capac- ity of around 200 people. Mulligans: Otherside has free shows most nights of the week and its own separate bar, known as the Pbar (for the preferred draft beer of the bar’s clientele). Booking agent Kevin Nunn thinks the venue is great for its laid-back and simple feel. “It makes me feel like it’s more of a souped-up basement


show than a venue,” Nunn said. “The fact that everything is free only makes me more willing to book a band I have never heard.” For those in the Lakeshore area, or those who may be un-


BIG HOUSE RED at Mulligan’s Other Side by Jon Clay


der 21, Lemonjello’s Coffee (61 E 9th St., Holland) can satisfy all of your music and caffeine cravings. “[W]e are one of the longest-running all-ages venues in the state,” said Matthew Scott, Lemonjello’s owner. All shows are $3 or less. Upcoming shows in April include The Creaky Floors, All at Sea, and Stacey Koziel on April 1. On April 15, check out Bliss Like This, Dave Snapper and the Hipster Choir, GHOST, and My Heart My Stronghold. By Nick Manes


32 | REVUEWM.COM | APRIL 2011


f you are looking to get your funny bone tickled frugally, there happens to be several affordable comedic performances in West Michigan. Crawlspace Theatre Productions, the inhabitants of


Farmers Alley Theatre (221 Farmers Alley, Kalamazoo), provide atypi- cal improv and sketch comedy for a low price. The self-proclaimed Kalamazoo home for comedy is dissected into several troupes, includ- ing Crawlspace Eviction, t&a, Kind of Pretty Women and Brotherhood. As the flagship team, Crawlspace Eviction made a name for itself with off-beat and nuanced humor, while the t&a duo use memorable characters to get a reaction. Show prices range from $5 for late-night performances to $7 with a student ID. Mondays could be the least funny days of the week, but they don’t


have to be. Dog Story Theatre (7 Jefferson, Grand Rapids) offers cheap admission and a comical way to start your week. Comedy Mondays cost only $5, a great value considering that the lineup can include anything from standup to puppetry, film, music or short-style improv à la “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” Dr. Grins Comedy Club’s (20 Monroe Ave. NW, Grand Rapids)


annual Funniest Person in Grand Rapids contest begins April 6 and continues for 10 weeks. Admission is $5 with pitchers and pizza the same price once you’re in. Calvin IMPROV, a student group from the local college, has been


wrestling chortles out of audiences for 23 years. Unfortunately for your improv comedy needs, the troupe only performs a few times a year. Fortunately for your pocketbook, the shows are always free. Also free is the Sunday Night Funnies at the Landing Lounge,


located at the Radisson (270 Ann St., Grand Rapids). Every Sunday, lo- cal comics take the stage for a night of free funny. By Samara Napolitan


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE


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