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News & Views


Casual Indian dining to take off


Dishoom, the all-day spice dining brand, believes it will lead a fresh wave of Indian operators aiming to exploit the gap between high-end restaurants and the traditional curry house.


The Indian casual-dining market has been identified as ready for growth and remains largely untapped in the UK despite the nation’s appetite for ethnic food, the company says. Dishroom suggests the success of its inau- gural site on London’s Upper St Martin’s Lane will prompt further expansion and attract new entrants into the sector.


Dishoom itself is on the lookout for more suit- able sites, though these are likely to be smaller than its existing two-floor café brasserie. “There’s a rich seam of heritage in Indian food that hasn’t really been explored in the UK,” says co-founder Shamil Thakrar. “The curry house is a unique tradition specific to this island, albeit a fantastic one. We wanted to go back to India itself, if you like.”


Thakrar points to the existence of a new gen- eration of entrepreneurial UK Indians who are changing the ethnic food landscape. “In the Indian food space, no one’s really cracked lunch before. Curry was always seen as a bit too heavy. But that’s all changing now,” he says.


There is evidence to back up his claims. In London, the likes of Imli, a tapas-style offshoot of Michelin-starred Tamarind, fast casual concept Mooli’s in Soho and Delhi Grill in Islington, along with Dishoom, are leading this revolution.


Spice Business Magazine


5


March 2011


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