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News & Views Azad shows a spicy way to weight loss


An Oxfordshire chef who specialises in Asian food believes people can spice up their diets yet still cut down on the calories. Azad Hussain, at The Vine and Spice, in Long Wittenham, has come up with a tasty, yet low-calorie menu, after speaking to one of his customers who was about to embark on a boring post-Christmas diet.


Azad says he has always avoided using a lot of oil in his cooking, so all he had to do was take it a little further to enable customers to cut down the calories. Machli dum is one of several dishes designed for those looking for fewer calories as are hariyali machli and handi tarkari.


Azad has been living in the UK since 1983 although he began cooking before that in Bangladesh. Although he knew how to cook Asian dishes, he felt it was important to attend a British cook- ery school and so took his City and Guild certificates at the Westminster Catering College, in London. He then extended his knowledge by making frequent visits to India, to seek out authentic recipes he could add to his repertoire.


Wolverhampton restaurant on the market


The Red Fort restaurant in Wolverhampton’s Fold Street has been put on the market. It is understood the restaurant will keep its name, but owner Shander Herian, wants to take a back-seat role.


Red Fort’s lease is reprtedly on the market for £120,000 and carries an annual rent of £40,000. The 160-seat restaurant employs about 10 people, mostly part-time.


Mr Haerian says, “We are not closing down and all of those jobs will stay. It is only the management who will go. If the right person comes along, we will let them take it over. Otherwise we will carry on and be here for a few more years.”


Spice Business Magazine


33


March 2011


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