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School News


By EMILY TAFFEL-SCHAPER


Mayor’s Top Teen W


hen Mayor Michael Udine began the “Mayor’s Top Teens” program, a program for the City of Parkland that recognizes and celebrates deserving teenagers, his goal was to create a community that values teens and


promotes a positive image of them. His mission was to find teens that could be role models for others, and Parkland resident David Strick was a natural choice to be named a Top Teen for his community service and his natural ability to inspire everyone around him.


“The Mayor’s Top Teen David Strick is a positive role model for all of the youths in our community. He has been involved in numerous community service projects including working with Women in Distress, America’s Moms for Soldiers and participating in the Autism Speaks walks. David also has impressive academic achievements. He has been an honor student since the 6th grade and will be inducted into the National Honor Society this spring,” said Mayor Udine. “Students this deserving are who we created the Top Teen Program for.”


Eligible for the program are Parkland resident teens completing 9th, 10th or 11th grades and either attending a private or public school or home-schooled within the City of Parkland municipal limits. Teachers, counselors, friends, clergy or family (but not their parents or the student themselves) can make the nominations. The program is publicized through all area media, schools, the Parkland Library and a variety of youth and community organizations.


David was nominated by his brother Evan Strick who said, “I nominated my brother because I knew he met all the criteria for the program was seeking; a teen that has overcome obstacles, is an honor student, performs community service, and is a role model for others. In addition, he is a great kid with a strong work ethic and positive outlook. My family and I are very proud of David and all that he has accomplished.”


v Top Teen David Strick holds the award he received from the City of Parkland. Photo courtesy of the City of Parkland.


Strong spirit and a desire to succeed come through and David exudes a strength of character and empathy for others rarely seen. His struggle with Autism Spectrum Disorder has made him push harder every day to meet and exceed the levels of work of those around him and has given him the desire to help others whenever possible. He is a role model for others with different abilities.


When I asked David what being chosen as Parkland’s Top Teen meant to him he said, “It is confirmation that that hard work pays off and I am very thankful to the city of Parkland for recognizing my efforts.”


J.P. Taravella Ethics Seminar and Workshop By JAMIE MALONEY F


or the 21st year in a row, select seniors from J.P. Taravella High School attended the “Ethical Decision Making in the Workplace and Society”


seminar and workshop. Twelve local business people from partner companies were on hand and served as Table Leaders for the approximately 110 students who participated in the event.


The purpose of the event is for students to examine the role of ethics in decision-making and explore the application of ethical values in the workplace. The day consisted of a motivational speaker and a series of activities centered on ethics and the decision-making process. At the end of


the day, each business partner presented teams of


students with an ethical dilemma. Students then applied the decision-making process to help their


respective business partners find an ethical solution to the problem.


The “Ethical Decision Making in the Workplace and Society”


seminar previously received the Sunshine


Medallion 2nd place award by the Sunshine State School Public Relations Association.


“The two objectives of the program are to give the students an opportunity to examine the role of ethics in the decision-making process and to provide students with


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the opportunity to explore the application of ethical values to their future careers,” said John Congemi, the seminar coordinator. “Activities range from watching videos with actual business dilemmas and trying to solve them using ethics, to making a group decision on who should receive a heart transplant.”


Throughout the 20-year history of the seminar, the


evaluations completed by students and table leaders have been positive and enthusiastic. Coral Springs City News followed up with several of the Table Leaders and student participants to get their reactions after the event:


“I felt that the most beneficial characteristic of the Ethics Workshop was having group discussions and hearing open responses from the various business representatives as well as other students.” – Brittany Roberts, J.P. Taravella Senior


“It was a huge success. All seniors in high school should have the opportunity to take part in this great experience.” – Mikhail Hutton, J.P. Taravella Senior


“At AXA Advisors we are committed to volunteerism and getting involved in our local communities. Being active and giving back to the communities we serve strengthens


our relationships. It’s a pleasure to spend time with such wonderful young people and is tremendously rewarding for me to participate in an event that brings ethics to the forefront of these students’ minds. I hope that this event somehow impacts


in a positive way as they move through life and enter the professional world.” – Ryan McLain, a Director of Retirement Benefits Group, AXA Advisors


“This is my fourth or fifth year participating and I’m only 28. The kids really interest me. It’s amazing to see their value systems, and to see kids from all different walks of life in one arena having to compromise.” – Dana Josephson, Marketing Director, McFarlane Dolan & Barnett


“I had a great time and I think the teenagers did, too. It is important for teens to have other adults as positive influences, to share our experiences and some tough decisions we’ve had to make.” – Larry Vignola, Coral Springs City Commissioner


“Its fun with the kids, and its nice to see them dress up and come with a different demeanor. I’m proud to see these young adults put forth an effort to make themselves better.” – Mike Ando, Vice President, Bank of America Parkland


To Advertise in Coral Springs and Parkland City News, Please call 954-255-5226 March 2011 9 their decision making processes


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