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Full of praise The pros and cons of creating lighting schemes for churches and cathedrals.


One of they key requirements for today’s lighting schemes for churches and cathedrals is to be energy efficient whilst still maintaining the integrity and history of the surroundings – not always an easy feat. Churches are also much more than just a place of worship; they are now used for many more activities so the lighting needs to accommodate this. When lighting a church Deb Wythe,


creative director at Design In Progress, says: ‘I am very aware that the building will outlive me let alone my lighting scheme, so it's important to design a scheme that can be removed and replaced without too much damage to the structure. ‘Churches are used for much more than just services these days so the lighting needs to be able to adapt to the different functions. Its tempting to make older churches just look dramatic, but important to remember that in the congregation areas people need to have enough light to read the hymn sheets. Get the balance right and the results can be spectacular.’ Wythe says most churches do their own maintenance, so long lamp life/prolonging lamp life with a dimming system and sensible accessible heights for the fittings should be considered when designing and discussed with the client before installing. Dernier & Hamlyn’s joint managing


director, Jeremy Quantrill shares his experience of lighting for churches and cathedrals: ‘Dernier & Hamlyn’s work in churches and cathedrals tends primarily to focus either on refurbishment of existing light fittings or working in partnership with architects to produce new fittings that combine the requirements for historic integrity and practicality while empathising with the style of the building. Quantrill says refurbishment projects are often about looking at ways in which fittings can be updated to make them more energy efficient, and frequently include inconspicuously incorporating the emergency lighting that was not a legal requirement when the fitting was installed,


12 www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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