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LIFESTYLE: Stollen by Victoria Baker of www.littlewrenpottery.co.uk


Stollen was first baked in Germany at the Saxon Royal Court in 1427, since the 15th century the recipe has been changed and revised by bakers around the world. The concept, however, has remained the same; a rich bread like fruitcake packed full of raisins and citrus peel.


Dresden is home to the historic Stollen Festival that takes place annually where special bakers produce loaves that are marked with the King’s seal. When eating a loaf you might notice the similarity to Panettone, Christmas Cake and Kerstsol.


Stollen can be eaten as an alternative to the heavier Christmas cake, which isn’t always to everyone’s taste. This recipe has been tweaked to include cranberries and pistachios but


74 | ukhandmade | Winter 2010


currants and flaked almonds can easily be substituted.


The recipe makes one small loaf but could be doubled to make one large loaf or two smaller gift loaves.


Ingredients: • 25g raisins • 25g dried cranberries • 30g mixed peel • 3 tbsp dark rum • 275g strong white bread flour • 7g sachet yeast • 25g golden caster sugar • 1 tsp nutmeg • 1 tsp cinnamon • Zest of half a lemon • 40g butter • 125 ml milk • 1 beaten egg • 25g pistachios • 25g glace cherries


• 150g marzipan • 50g icing sugar


Method: 1. Mix the raisins, cranberries and mixed peel in a bowl and pour over the rum. Leave them to soak overnight. 2. Next day, in a large bowl mix the flour, yeast, sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon and lemon zest. Rub in the butter until it resembles fine breadcrumbs. 3. Warm the milk until it is hand hot and add in half the beaten egg. Bring the dough together in the bowl using the milk mixture. If it isn’t forming add more milk. 4. Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for 5 minutes. Once kneaded place it into a bowl and cover a tea towel and leave in a warm place for an hour to double in size. 5. Knead the dough a few times


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