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SCENE:Woodbridge Festival Market by Adele Sellears of www.adeledesign.com


Woodbridge Festival Market in Suffolk was created by the Deben Events group with the intention of bringing “a little taste of Portobello Road to the relaxed atmosphere of Suffolk”. The group share an interest in interiors, antiques, design and trawling through auctions, sourcing unusual things for the home. They come from a variety of backgrounds – Sarah Hill was a commercial illustrator, her husband, Richard, is a television cameraman, Jacqueline Cassidy works in shipping and her partner, Richard, was a freelance journalist and is now a PR Manager.


Combined they bring a formidable range of skills and experience that are thrown into the pot to good effect. Before moving to Suffolk, the Hills had a lighting business on Columbia Road in London, which


38 | ukhandmade | Winter 2010


stocked classic, retro lights topped off with lampshades made from vintage fabrics. Sarah continues to source lights and makes lampshades.


The group’s aim is to recreate some of that lovely atmosphere found at European festive markets in their bigger cities, akin to a smaller-scale German market in the traditional setting of a market square but in the heart of a Suffolk market town.


The group ensures that the festive market has a good selection of gift ideas and presents. Some of the items are new and others have a more retro feel. Vintage knitwares and recycled accessories stand alongside old-fashioned baubles and other Christmas decorations. There’s everything from handmade shoes, luxurious cashmere scarves,


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