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windows. Children were kept entertained angel spotting and everyone wholeheartedly enjoyed the diversity of materials used, from old Christmas cards, flower heads, newspaper and fabric to wire, wood and wool. Some were tiny, whilst others brought traffic to a halt.


where people had worked together to make decorative pieces for the church.


The evening I spotted the Angel on the Truggery roof on the main A271 road was startling. Herstmonceux is famous for its Sussex trug baskets, used originally for measuring grain and their Angel was a thing of beauty, crafted from willow and sweet chestnut sitting in a trug over their door. Opposite, on the roof of the local B&B, an Angel with knitted legs had wings that twinkled blue after dark. The woolly legs stretched in the


20 | ukhandmade | Winter 2010


heavy rain and she acted as a beacon for the festive period, impossible to miss for those travelling west. Men up ladders fixing Angels to walls and rooftops became a common sight. The kitchen showroom was bedecked with wooden flying angels and strings of lights. I organised a late night Christmas shopping evening that was featured in Sussex Life Magazine and, right on cue at 7pm, two large Christmas trees were installed and lit outside the pub.


Throughout the festive period people peered at the festive


The following year, 2008, buoyant from the success of the first art trail I chose the theme ‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’. Geese-a-laying ran amok across the vast windows of the Primary School. Our next door neighbours received great praise for their patriotic Olympic loops before the penny dropped they were, of course, 5 Gold Rings. Again the press releases were well received and with Arts Hut home to a brood of French Hens, the Trail was featured in ‘Practical Poultry’ magazine.


In 2009, year three, I picked the simple theme of ‘Christmas Stockings’, although the wind, rain and snow proved challenging. Lime Cross Nursery had pink stockings hanging


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