This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER’S COLUMN I


General Manager Norman Rich nrich@themac.com Senior Executive Assistant Tara Lematta tlematta@themac.com


Chief Financial Offi cer/AGM Tim Arbogast tarbogast@themac.com Executive Assistant Julie Yocom jyocom@themac.com Security Manager Dennis Wright dwright@themac.com


Controller John Foley jfoley@themac.com


Athletic Director Edward Stoner estoner@themac.com Assistant Athletic Director Pete Greer pgreer@themac.com


Aquatics Manager Reid Macdonald rmacdonald@themac.com Fitness Manager Darrell Duvauchelle dduvauchelle@themac.com Gymnastics Manager Meg Doxtator mdoxtator@themac.com Junior Sports Manager Dan Baggett dbaggett@themac.com Outdoor Manager Chad Failla cfailla@themac.com Squash Manager Khalid Mir kmir@themac.com


Tennis Manager Wayne Pickard wpickard@themac.com


Communications Director Michole Jensen mjensen@themac.com


Electronic Communications Manager Charlie Levenson clevenson@themac.com


Food & Beverage Director Cameron McMurry cmcmurry@themac.com Executive Chef Philippe Boulot pboulot@themac.com


Private Dining Manager Alice Nafziger anafziger@themac.com


Human Resources Director Alison Beppler abeppler@themac.com


Member Services Director Linda Ornelas lornelas@themac.com Child Care Manager Dawna Yntema dyntema@themac.com


Guest Services Manager Christine Natonek cnatonek@themac.com


The -M-Porium Manager Tonya Mitchell tmitchell@themac.com Member Services Manager Dave Hanna dhanna@themac.com


Operations Director Mark Ellington mellington@themac.com Physical Plant Manager Dwayne Brantley Purchasing Manager Barry Kaufman bkaufman@themac.com


www.theMAC.com


recently attended my son’s football banquet at Jesuit High School. Yes, they are a powerhouse of talent; and no, they did not win the state champi- onship! That honor went to a better team this year. We congratu- late Aloha High School on a wonderful win and a chance to return their program to something they had enjoyed many years ago.


I was struck by the accompanying


emotions of the football players, their parents, the coaches and school administrators during this event. I am certain these same emotions are shared in all football programs around the nation. The statement that stuck most with me was that parents entrust their children to the coaches, and the coaches are obligated and fortunate enough to teach the players the values of great sportsmanship and football skills, and make them better than before. We have similar programs in other


sports at MAC, and I know our coaches, managers, supervisors, parents and athletes feel the same way. Having such a strong desire to excel in sports is an important and meaningful concept. So many of our athletes have gone on to sports at higher levels, whether high school, elite or travel teams, recreational, college and university, professional or Olympic. Our coaches help develop these athletes; however, the real work goes to the athletes themselves as they improve themselves by listening to advice by their coaches. Balancing the skills of the athletes and the drive of the coaches is a diffi cult task that gets refi ned often to ensure teamwork between coach and athlete is at its best. The strongest bonds are between athletes and coaches, and can be achieved with parents taking a backseat (but not a sideline) as this relationship builds. The football banquet was preceded that same weekend with a basketball tourna- ment at Jesuit for younger athletes; the high school athletes and their parents volunteered to raise money for their athletic department. It was not a chore at all but rather a pleasure to work with other parents and watch the athletes work together for


the betterment of their sports. My wife and I are reliving our high school days through the eyes of our children. To me it is better than the fi rst time around.


MAC sports programs are some of


Norm Rich GENERAL MANAGER


the best in the country, delivered by staff that never forgets the club’s mission that goes back to our earliest traditions. I have sentimental feelings for the quotation from Hodding Carter, which is printed in the closing page of Legacy of the Twenty-Six:


“There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children. One of these is roots, the other wings.”


On this, the start of our 120th anni-


versary, these words could not be more meaningful. We will have a year of celebra- tion that balances between our rooted traditions with the promise the future brings to us all. We continue to invest heavily into our club, its staff and facilities to ensure we can deliver our children with the roots that are important, as well as the wings to fl y to their next challenge. Most of us strive to leave a legacy of goodness, some greatness, and meaningful accomplishments that make us proud. I know I do. Trustees and management have been


entrusted by the membership to care for their club and to ensure they leave it to future generations better than they received it. It’s not an easy task for any individual or group of individuals. With that in mind, I want to take the


opportunity to thank our retiring trustees for their important contributions to our club. Important and invaluable decisions have been made for the betterment of your club. Thank you to retiring President Phil Juckeland, Vice President Sydney Baer, Treasurer Rob Thompson and Secretary Leslie Vanbellinghen for their support, dedi- cation and time invested in the club. They did leave it better than they received it. Congratulations to new President


Bill June, Vice President Vicki Tagliafi co, Treasurer Ron Neiger and Secretary Lisa Caplan Girard. Our management team looks forward to working with you and making our club an even better place. Welcome to new Trustees Carl Burnham, Jim Cleary, Gwen Farnham Hyland and Craig Iverson for agreeing to serve on the board, and continuing to help debate and make lasting decisions that benefi t the membership. WM


MARCH 2011 | The Wınged M | 7


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88