This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE COMEDY OF


Aasif Mandvi Behind the


PHOTO: JON CLAY


Funny Tweeter: Rei Robinson (@geniustown)


wordsmith, who constantly comes up with humorous homonym and palindrome combinations and uses his linguistic skills for comedic purposes. Interestingly, he has found that the best outlet for his sometimes ag- gravating, sometimes confusing, but always hilarious writings is Twitter. Robinson, also known as @geniustown, does not


R


presently own a computer or a smartphone. He tweets by either borrowing his roommate’s computer or by texting


ei Robinson is well-known in the Eastown com- munity as the surly barista at 79 coffee shop. Many are unaware that he is also an accomplished


via his Motorola Juke. But @geniustown does not let a silly thing like not owning a computer get in the way of his being silly online. Just take, for example, this tweet:


The word “ukulele” means “uke chameleon.” #factsfromadreamihad


One of Robinson’s favorite Twitter memes to partici-


pate in is #FollowFriday. Robinson takes this to a new level, sometimes writing up to 30 follow Friday tweets a week. This is not easy, considering that he comes up with a new common joke each week to tie all the tweets together. “[Twitter is] an arena where you can interact with


others you never would,” Robinson said. “It’s a great tool for comedic writing.” By Nick Manes


Fake News show time Saturday @ 8pm March 12, 2011 Frauenthal Theater Muskegon


Scenes of the REAL


about the show FakeNewsGuy.com


Tickets on sale thru the web site or the Frauenthal Box Office


TheDailyShowwithJonStewartcorrespondent Aasif Mandvi brings audiences behind the scenes of the hit primetime news satire. He shows how the writers and correspondents analyze the best and worst of each day's news to bring you hilarious insight into the often ridiculous world of politics and international relations.


REVUEWM.COM | MARCH 2011 | 31


SCENE SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE


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