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Hudson~Litchfield Sports Hudson~Litchfield Sports


Hudson Recreation Basketball Honors ‘Barbara Hamilton Day’


5th/6th Grade Girls: first, Alyssia


Barbara Hamilton Sportsmanship Award winners Andrew Teague and Dominique Kaempf with Steve Porter and Dave Yates, Recreation Director


submitted by Dave Yates, Recreation Director On Sunday, February 13, the players,


coaches, and parents of Hudson Recreation Basketball celebrated Barbara Hamilton Day. This day remembers past Recreation Director, Barbara Hamilton, for her tireless efforts on behalf of the children of Hudson. She always stressed sportsmanship, playing hard, and having fun.


Hills-Garrison, Memorial, and Nottingham West School were all busy with foul-shooting contests and Recreational All- Star Games. There was a great display of fouling shooting throughout each division’s contests. The winners of the contests were: 3rd/4th Grade Girls: first, Gabby Sousa; second, Emily Lizotte 3rd/4th Grade Boys: first, Cameron Jones; second, Adam Melanson


Fournier; second, Cleo LaRoche 5th/6th Grade Boys: first, Bruce Gaudet; second, Jonathan Dixon 7th/8th Grade Girls: first, Teia Cestrone; second, Lexis Gaudet 7th/8th Grade Boys: first, Tim Cohen; second, Rishi Yemme The Recreational All-Star Games consisted of two players from each intramural team. These players were selected by their coaches to represent their team based on talent, dedication, and sportsmanship. The games were very competitive and entertaining. The many family and friends in attendance were enthusiastic and appreciative of the effort shown by all the players. A special part of the day was the presentation of the “Hank Center Award.” Hank was another person who showed tireless effort in many capacities in youth sports and stressed sportsmanship to all. This award is given to one eighth grade girl and boy who shows dedication to his/her team, consistently attends practices and games, and has shown the highest level of sportsmanship toward teammates, other players, coaches, and referees. Plaques were presented to the winners. The winners of this year’s award were Dominique Kaempf and Andrew Teague.


Hudson - Litchfield News February 18, 2011 - 11


Piece of the Pie Maintaining Your


The Income Tax Return W.F.Boutin EA - Total Tax Solutions LLC


Last week, we left off at the calculation of our taxable income, and now we need to understand how tax is calculated from this number. With this knowledge, we will have the foundation for explaining how deductions, credits and various fringe benefits available to many taxpayers can affect your individual situation. There are several tax brackets established by the tax code being the 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, and 35%. Each percentage has a “bracket” of income allocated to it, based upon a particular filing status. This table is known as the Tax Rate Schedule. For instance, the 2010 tax rate schedule shows that the 10% tax


‘Bullets’ Basketball Team Wins Back-to-Back Championships


bracket for a single individual is from $0 to $8350, whereas the 10% tax bracket for a taxpayer who qualifies as a head of house- hold is $0 to $11,950. A single person, who has taxable income of $15,025, has a tax liability of $1836 taken from the tax tables. The first $8350 is taxed at 10%; the balance of $6675 is taxed at 15%. The $1836 tax liability is 12.22% of the $15,025 taxable income. This 12.22% is the mean of the two percentage brackets (10% and 15%) used to calculate the tax. Based upon this schedule, a single person starts to pay 15 cents on the dollar at $8350, .25 @ $33,950, .28 @ $82,250, .33 @ $171,550 and .35 @$372,950. With this understanding, we can see that a taxpayer may have gross income in a 25% tax bracket, but if they have enough deductions, they can lower their taxable income to a 15% tax bracket. Deductions that lower the gross income come in many forms. Adjustments allowed on the tax return to arrive at the AGI, lowers this income which results in a lower AGI and lower taxable income. The standard /itemized deduction and exemptions lower the taxable income but not the AGI. Various fringe benefits (Cafeteria or Section 125 Plans) offered by employers allow a taxpayer to pay for certain benefits before taxes are withheld. This also lowers their earned income reported on line 7, which conse- quently lowers the AGI and the taxable income for that taxpayer. How much it saves any taxpayer is proportionate to where their taxable income would be without the benefit. (The single taxpayer in the example above saves .15 on every dollar that they lower their taxable income of $15,025, until they would lower it below $8350, when they would then start to save only .10 on the dollar.)


Examples of fringe benefits offered by employers are health


insurance, life insurance, dependent care assistance, Health Savings Accounts for taxpayers who have eligible, high deductible health insurance policies, and medical savings accounts for out of pocket medical expenses to name a few. Usually these types of benefits not only save on federal and state taxes, but are not taxable income for Social Security/ Medicare with holding purposes as well, saving an additional 7.65% for the taxpayer. Money contrib- uted to 401K or IRA plans are pre-tax for federal and state tax purposes only and are also a means of lowering taxable income and AGI.


Hudson Recreation Junior Girls’ Bullets Basketball Team, back row: Kayla Rondeau, Amber Rondeau, Megan Demers, Katherine Callery,


Rebecca Alpert. Bottom row: Julia McCaffrey, Haillie Mousseau, Jillian Houle, Mallory Floyd, Coach Jack Floyd


submitted by Jack Floyd, Hudson Recreation Basketball The Bullets started the 2010 season strong and continued to


improve as the year progressed. They went undefeated throughout the regular season, but lost their opening playoff game to the Dream. The Bullets fought their way back through the playoffs, winning three games in a row to advance to the championship game against the Dream, the only team that beat the Bullets all year. The championship was played at Alvirne High School on February 12. The championship game was close and very exciting, but the Bullets


Hudson Recreation Junior Girls’ Bullets Basketball Team with their Championship trophies, back row: Katherine Callery, Megan Demers,


Rebecca Alpert, Haillie Mousseau, Jillian Houle, Mallory Floyd. Bottom row: Coach Jack Floyd, Kayla Rondeau, Julia McCaffrey, Amber Rondeau


hung on to win their second Junior Girls’ championship in two years. In the past two years, the Bullets have won two championships with 22 wins and only two losses. Once again, the Bullets achieved all of this success while playing


each and every girl on the team for at least two full quarters in every single game from the beginning of the season through the playoffs. can be done. There are no “benchwarmers” on the Bullets.


Area Ballet Students Garner Gold and Silver at National Ballet Exams


submitted by Donna Bramante On Sunday, February 13, 46 dedicated ballet students from Londonderry Dance Academy (LDA) performed prescribed ballet exercises and routines, demonstrating their technical and artistic skills for the chance to earn American Academy of Ballet rankings and medals. Internationally known choreographer and teacher Mignon Furman arrived from New York City to judge highly trained


Gymnast Qualifies for Spring States


submitted by Anne Boulia Nashua School of Gymnastics Level 9 gymnast Taylor Boulia of Hudson attended a local qualifying meet on Saturday, January 29, at Wilkey’s Gymnastics in Tewksbury, MA. She was looking for a score of 32.00 or higher in order to qualify for NH Spring States in March. She qualified with an all-around score of 33.025 (third). She scored 8.70 on vault, 8.40 (second) on bars, 7.50 on beam, and 8.425 on floor.


Londonderry Dance Academy students throughout the afternoon. Furman is the Director of the American Academy of Ballet, an organization that teaches and judges ballet training standards in many countries. This marked the 16th year that the ballet students of LDA, under the direction of Barbara Mullen, took part in the challenging national ballet exam series.


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Remember, a lower AGI on the tax return is comparable to the benefits of lower cholesterol levels to the heart in most cases. Many tax deductions and credits allowed by the tax code “phase out” for high income taxpayers. This phase-out range is calculated starting with the AGI found on the tax return and varies for each deduction or credit as we will discuss in the near future. Therefore concentrating on lowering the AGI of high tax bracket taxpayers is of the utmost importance. Next week: Itemized Deductions Have a tax question? E-mail taxquest@totaltxsolutions.com


About Total Tax Solutions: W.F. Boutin EA registered Total Tax Solutions in the State of NH as a LLC in the summer of 2006 after 10 years experience working for a major tax preparation company and 8 years of teaching various tax courses. The company mission is to deliver an excellent customer service experience year around, to offer knowledgeable advice so that clients can make informed decisions regarding their financial future, and to provide this service with integrity, confidence and professionalism.


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