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Morgan & Sanders and Gillows are the only two Regency period cabinet-makers who are known to have manufactured the Metamorphic Library Chair but there is evidence that other firms were making versions of the chair at the same time.


In addition and based on the results of the research it would also be reasonable to assume the following:


An even earlier version of the Library Step Chair may have been conceived by Jean-François Oeben for Madame de Pompadour during the 1750s (Linley, 1996, p. 121) and the origins of the idea probably date back to the seventeenth century.


Specific elements of the Trafalgar Chair design, such as the flat-sided single- piece construction of the rear legs and uprights, are likely to have originated in London (Payne, 1989, p. 96). This was probably in response to the increase in demand and the need to improve productivity. The exaggerated volutes of the arms are also likely to have first appeared in London based on the illustrations of George Smith.


Although Ackermann acknowledged Morgan & Sanders as the maker of the chair in July 1811, there was no suggestion that they originated the design. Since Ackermann was keen to celebrate the innovative achievements of Morgan & Sanders, it can be assumed that the Metamorphic Library Chair design was developed elsewhere. It is interesting to note Thomas Weeks‟ claim to have invented the chair and the evidence of a marked catch offered by Norman Adams (Claxton Stevens & Whittington, 1999, p. 459).


The Regency period Metamorphic Library Chair was made by firms other than Morgan & Sanders or Gillows. A chair that is almost identical to the Mallett example was attributed by Sotheby‟s in 2002 to William Trotter and there is no reason to question their assessment. Based on the evidence collected it would be reasonable to assume that Metamorphic Library Chairs were being manufactured by several cabinet-makers in London, a small number of regional firms and many others in the provinces during the second decade of the nineteenth century.


Since this is the first detailed analysis of the Regency period Metamorphic Library Chair the research has also exposed a few myths:


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