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determined to succeed. A continuous stream of new, innovative products fuelled by third-party manufacturing licenses and supported by aggressive advertising campaigns helped Morgan & Sanders to build an impressive client base. The quality of their work exceeded that of the other firms around Catherine Street and the Stand and, by 1811, when the Metamorphic Library Chair was featured in Ackermann‟s Repository they had already started to challenge the position of established firms in many of the Royal residences and stately homes.


Regency London welcomed the novel ways in which Morgan & Sanders combined neo-classical elegance with mechanical gadgetry. Globe writing tables, circular bookcases and metamorphic sideboards all appeared in 1810 and, by 1811 the Metamorphic Library Chair had made its debut. While Thomas Weeks claimed that it was his invention and sold a branded version of the Metamorphic Library Chair from his mechanical museum in Tichborne Street, Morgan & Sanders were probably busy planning their next product launch. Gradually, Morgan & Sanders‟ mechanical tables, desks and chairs started to appear in the homes of the wealthy. Similarities between the chairs at Trinity College Oxford and Tatton Park suggest that Wilbraham Egerton could have purchased a Morgan & Sanders Metamorphic Library Chair for his library in Cheshire. Gillows had already provided the bookcases, tables and other chairs in the same room and over one hundred other pieces to the Egerton family. A Metamorphic Library Chair bearing a William IV inventory mark in The Schneidman Collection, and two similar chairs in the Royal Collection, are adaptations of the Morgan & Sanders design. It is clear that Morgan & Sanders were successfully carving out a new market based on innovation and design and given their rate of growth it was only natural for Gillows and others to offer an alternative solution. In the words of, Charles Caleb Colton „imitation is the sincerest form of flattery‟, and by 1815 Gillows had made their own version of the Metamorphic Library Chair.


From the evidence collected it appears that there were two distinct groups of cabinet-makers at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Around Catherine Street and the Strand were the fast-moving entrepreneurs with roots in the competitive, product-oriented campaign furniture market. These, young, fashion-conscious businesses co-existed with well-established firms such as Chippendale, Gillow and Seddon. The older firms, while willing to manufacture Library Steps for their clients,


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