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appeared within a few years of the original designs. At least three examples were encountered while undertaking the field research for the dissertation. The first is located in the library at The Travellers Club in London75. The chair was apparently a favourite of the Queen Mother (Figure 32a).


Figure 32 – Regional Chairs Sources: The Travellers Club and Trinity College Oxford


The assumption that this is a regional chair is based on the quality of construction and the crudeness of the carvings on the front seat-rail and the top-rail. But, according to Mary Ann Hunting Massie (1990, p. 27) in her MA dissertation entitled, „The Furnishings of the Reform Club Interiors‟, Stephen Taprell and William Holland had enjoyed a monopoly of supply to establishments such as The Travellers Club and there is always the possibility that the chair was made by Taprell & Holland. It is interesting to note that the chair utilises a lever-operated latch mechanism similar to that used by Morgan & Sanders. The stylised tulip motif could be a reference to the club member that donated the Metamorphic Library Chair to The Travellers Club76. Two regional Metamorphic Library Chairs were also discovered alongside the Morgan & Sanders example in the Old Library at Trinity College Oxford (Figure 32b). The first has straight reeded arms, sabre-shaped legs, a plain front seat-rail and a hand-carved tablet top-rail. The second, which is a better quality chair, is of a more


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