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workshop cannot be overlooked. The similarities in the lever-operated latch mechanisms are clearly shown in Figure 27a.


Figure 27 – Field Research Results – Fittings Source: Field Research


With the exception of the Trinity College chair, there is no evidence of replacement hinges on any of the other inspected chairs, although many of the original screws holding the hinges in place have been replaced with later machine finished versions67. The hinges on the Mallett chair, each with a raised portion in the centre of the knuckle plate, could easily be a later addition (Figure 27b). Castors had been added to only two of the chairs and, from close inspection, both sets appear to be original. With reference to Chapter 3 regarding the use of castors and the safety of the chair, it is interesting to note that four of the six examples have remained castor- free for almost two hundred years. Uneven wear on two of these chairs indicate that they were seldom used as Library Steps due to the difficulty of moving them around. At Tatton Park, a much more practical cylinder ladder is propped up against the library bookcase to gain access to the higher shelves. Fittings that were provided with the original chair provide a useful and reliable means of identification. Since most of these parts were set into the frame of the chair and the height and design integrity of the chair changes dramatically when castors are added, any later


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