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reliable means of identification. Despite the availability of a fully dimensioned illustration in a Gillows Sketch Book from 1834, it has been shown the Trafalgar Chair based design dictated most of the primary dimensions and the size of the chair has no connection with the maker‟s identity.


7.1.2 Design


The sabre-shaped legs, curved-over knee and concave top-rail were all features of the standard Trafalgar Chair design and variations could indicate differences in the sources of manufacture. Areas of particular interest are: the design of the front-rail, the „profile of the sides‟, the shape of the top-rail and the contours of the small pedestals that separate the downward sweep of the voluted arms from the side-rails. In most cases the front-rail follows the curve of the knee, starting at the hinge and extending across the front of the chair (Figure 24a). In contrast, the front-rail of the Mallett chair is rather plain and certainly less-substantial. The Trafalgar Chair was constructed using flat sides so that the sections could be clamped together and made in pairs to speed up production and ensure symmetry. All of the sampled chairs have flat sides with the exception of the Mallett chair. Viewed from the top, the voluted arms of the Mallett chair have been elaborately contoured (Figure 24a).


Figure 24 – Field Research Results – Design Source: Field Research


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