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is clear that most Regency period Metamorphic Library Chairs were also constructed according to a common set of rules. Of the six chairs examined in the study the overall dimensions vary by less than five percent. Those with a tablet top-rail all share the same closed height of 36 inches (±2%), they are all 22 inches wide (±5%) and, although there are variations in the depth of the chairs, these are within acceptable tolerances for hand-made furniture of the period. The overall height and width of the Metamorphic Library Chairs examined are close to Hepplewhite‟s suggestions. The extra depth, of between three and four inches, was necessary to accommodate the steps. The chair at Mallett Antiques, with its extravagant side contouring, is a bulkier piece of furniture and the additional depth of four inches is justified by the solid stance of the sabre-legs and the over-scrolled top-rail. The dimensions of a Metamorphic Library Chair would therefore have been well known to Regency period chair-makers and they probably worked from outline specifications that were similar to the field research averages (Figures 23a and 23b).


Figure 23 – Field Research Results – Dimensions Source: Field Research


A heavier frame and a robust construction may suggest a Gillows piece since the firm was renowned for „solid and reliable‟ workmanship. Even so, it is clear from the similarities of the chair dimensions across the sample, that size cannot be used as a


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