This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
7. Comparison of Morgan & Sanders and Gillows Designs


Having established and tested the design assumptions for Morgan & Sanders and Gillows Regency period Metamorphic Library Chairs, it is now possible to build a more robust set of attribution criteria. This Chapter reassesses the results of the field research by comparing the features of all six chairs and suggests new guidelines that will help to improve the accuracy of attributions and catalogue descriptions.


7.1 Metamorphic Library Chair Design Differences


Chapters 5 and 6 identified a number of differences between the Regency period Metamorphic Library Chairs of Morgan & Sanders and Gillows. This section combines the knowledge gained so far and expresses these differences within the context of the following key attributes:


Dimensions – height, width and depth in the open and closed positions Design – front-rail, sides, top-rail and pedestals Decoration – reeding, paterae and carving Quality – timber, construction and proportions Fittings – catches, hinges and castors Finish – caning, makers‟ marks and condition


7.1.1 Dimensions


Standardised sizes were unusual during the first half of the eighteenth century when a knot in a plank of wood often dictated the size of a finished product. All this changed in the nineteenth century when neo-classical styles demanded strict adherence to the principles of perspective. As the English Empire designs evolved, Thomas Sheraton, George Smith and others continued to stress the relationship between good draughtsmanship and good craftsmanship. Chair-makers, keen to comply with the documented rules, used one or more of the manufacturers‟ guides and this, resulted in some degree of dimensional uniformity across the industry. Hepplewhite‟s Guide, first published in 1788, even provided a „standard‟ chair size; „width in front 20 inches, depth of the seat 17 inches, height of the seat frame 17 inches, total height 3 feet 1 inch‟ (Hepplewhite, 1969, p. 1). Based on the research it


- 63 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136