This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
6.1 Gillows Design Evidence


The firm of Gillows is unique in that it is the only business in the furniture industry to have left an illustrated history of its output. There are two hundred volumes in the Gillows archive owned by Westminster City Council containing information on more than twenty thousand items (Goodison & Hardy, 1970, p. 1). Between 1811 and 1840 the archives contain references to only two Library Step Chairs. The first, dated July 1815, refers to a chair made for John Upton by Edward Pye. Although the badly faded Sketch Book entry provides an itemised list of the materials and labour there is no accompanying illustration (Figure 19).


Figure 19 – Gillows 1815 Estimate for Library Chair Steps Source: Westminster City Archives, Gillows Sketch Book (344/99)


The estimate details for the chair are: „15½ ft of 1 inch reduced mahogany frame, 5 ft of ¾ inch baywood steps58, 1 pair of 1¼ inch brass clock hinges, 1 spring catch and glue screws etc.‟ The estimate also includes two additional lines suggesting that the chair was to be sub-contracted to Edward Pye59 for „making‟ and that the chair would be fitted with a caned seat before it was delivered to John Upton. The reference to the use of clock hinges and a spring catch are of particular interest. The clock hinges


- 54 -


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136