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The field research was used to answer the following questions:


1. Did the overall dimensions of any chair match those of the chair at Trinity College Oxford? Identical sizes and proportions may suggest that the same drawings and templates were used to manufacture the chair.


2. Did any of the chairs use the same brass fittings? The chairs could have been produced at any time between 1811 (Ackermann‟s Repository article) and 1819 (Morgan & Sanders no longer trading). It is possible that design improvements were made or that Morgan & Sanders changed their suppliers during this period. Even so, the discovery of identical hinges or catches would increase the possibility that a chair originated from the same workshop.


3. Although Morgan & Sanders offered a custom service, most changes to the basic design would conform to a restricted set of finishing options. These options could include: reduced or extended reeding, carved decoration to the top-rail and the addition of castors. This would have allowed the chairs to be manufactured to a standard pattern while accommodating individual preferences. Could any of the chairs have been modified from the same basic design?


The tabulated results of research relating to all three chairs are included as Appendix 10.8. These results can be summarised as follows:


Dimensions – The overall dimensions of the three chairs in both the closed and the open positions are virtually identical and certainly within hand-crafted manufacturing tolerances during the Regency period (±5%). The dimensions are so close that it suggests the use of cutting and shaping templates to create the side profiles and curved sections of the voluted arms.


Decoration – The style and application of the double-reeded design on the Trinity College chair and the example in the Schneidman Collection are identical. The reeding on the Butchoff chair is slightly different but the depth and quality of the carving is consistent across all three chairs. Features such as the plain panel on the front-rail of the Butchoff chair could easily have been substituted for the fully reeded version to meet the requirements of a customer.


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