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Buckler‟s painting ca. 1820. Whether the chair was made by Gillows, Morgan & Sanders or another manufacturer will be examined in Chapters 6 and 8, but the example illustrates the way in which Gillows relied on their affiliations and relationships to develop their business. As Catholics, many of Gillow‟s contracts came through the church including commissions for Sir Thomas Hesketh of Rufford, Lord Arundell and Lady Clifford46. Samuel and James Wyatt introduced Gillows to several major projects including the refurnishing of Heaton House and a number of Royal residences such as Frogmore House and Windsor Castle. Unlike Morgan & Sanders who courted publicity, Gillows never placed an advertisement relying instead on their contacts and their reputation. It was this reputation for dependable quality that was eventually immortalised in Gilbert & Sullivan‟s HMS Pinafore when Josephine sings, „On the one hand, papa's luxurious home, Hung with ancestral armour and old brasses, Carved oak and tapestry from distant Rome, Rare "blue and white" Venetian finger-glasses, Rich oriental rugs, luxurious sofa pillows, And everything that isn't old, from Gillows.‟


Morgan & Sanders relied on products and publicity. Their lack of tenure in the trade put them at a significant disadvantage relative to the established firms such as Seddon, Chippendale and Gillow. While the quality of their cabinet-work met the demands of discerning customers such as Lord Nelson and some members of the Royal family, Morgan & Sanders would still find it difficult to shake off their reputation as a purveyor of patent bedsteads and camp equipage. While the sales associated with the Metamorphic Library Chair would have been welcomed, close ties with Thomas Weeks and the provision of novelty furniture may have curtailed any ambitions they had to be accepted in the same circles as the traditional firms. This could explain the absence of the Metamorphic Library Chair


advertisements or, indeed, their use of a third-party sales channel for the product. The pieces of Morgan & Sanders furniture featured in The Repository following the launch of the Metamorphic Library Chair are altogether more serious – a Sofa Writing Table in 1811, a Library Bookcase in 1812, a State Bed in 1813 and a Carlton House Table and Chair in 1814. Gone were the mechanical patent designs they had used to generate market interest and attract new customers during the early years. They were now promoting themselves as high-end cabinet-makers and their advertisements focused increasingly on the prestige of their customers.


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from their


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