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at a time when excess was associated with greed and revolutionary sentiments, unnecessary extravagances were to be avoided. Even so, the public‟s fascination with gadgetry and the availability of the Metamorphic Library Chair from Weeks‟ museum would have created interest. The added publicity provided by Ackermann‟s monthly magazine, would also have stimulated demand. With Morgan & Sanders offering to customise their basic design it is likely that they took the lion-share of the market, but other manufacturers would also have included the Metamorphic Library Chair in their range of library furniture to avoid the potential loss of business. Morgan & Sanders, as patent furniture specialists with one hundred mechanics, would have made chairs for stock to cope with the predicted demand. But others, especially Gillows who were seldom at the sharp end of the fashion scene, would continue to rely on making the chairs to order. In the same year that Ackermann featured the Metamorphic Library Chair in The Repository, Wilbraham Egerton was putting the final touches to his library at Tatton Park in Cheshire (Figure 12).


Figure 12 – Tatton Park Library by J.C. Buckler ca. 1820 Source: National Trust Photo Library (Ref. 133822)


Before his death in 1807, Samuel Wyatt had been commissioned by the Egerton‟s to build the neo-classical mansion. Wyatt had been a close friend of Robert Gillow, and it was natural that Gillows should be chosen as the cabinet-makers. It is believed that around 1811 a Metamorphic Library Chair of a similar design to that described by Ackermann was added to the finished library but the chair does not appear in the


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